William Foster COCKSHUTT

COCKSHUTT, William Foster

Personal Data

Party
Unionist
Constituency
Brantford (Ontario)
Birth Date
October 17, 1855
Deceased Date
November 22, 1939
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Foster_Cockshutt
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=4377f02c-8021-4cd3-9d64-deaad7b31431&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
businessman, manufacturer

Parliamentary Career

November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
CON
  Brantford (Ontario)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
CON
  Brantford (Ontario)
December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
UNION
  Brantford (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 5 of 191)


May 27, 1921

Mr. COCKSHUTT:

I went all through it and I saw the nature of it. It is nothing like the extent of this building/ I repeat, we have got very good value in this building. I think the money has been well expended. When we consider that this building is to stand for at least a hundred 2531

years, perhaps two hundred-it is built of the most durable material and should last a great many more years than that-I cannot agree with the hon. member for Brome that there has been a lavish expenditure, and if the building can be completed for $10,000,000, the cost cannot be called excessive at the present time.

With regard to acoustics, I believe that the hon. member for Port Arthur (Mr. Keefer) has given us one of the main reasons why gentlemen are not heard in this chamber. They do not exert themselves when they speak. I have never heard any one complain that he could not hear the hon. member for Brome (Mr. McMaster), and there are others who can always be heard-sometimes we hear more than we wish to. It is largely a matter of exerting the voice and trying to make people hear.

I would like to draw the minister's attention to the acoustics of another room, much smaller than this chamber, and that is the Railway Committee room. It is almost impossible to hear a speaker there. You can hear the voice, but the words all seem to run together, and the result is that a great many sentences are lost entirely. It is not because the room is too large, not because the speakers are not speaking up well, but there is something wrong in that room which certainly needs attention.

As to the tower, I hotpe that the very greatest care will be taken in its erection. I have seen one tower fall-in the western block, a few years ago. I happened to be looking out of my window in the direction of the tower, and saw it fall. And another tower was torn down, at the museum. I think we had far better build a tower that is safe than try to reach up too much towards the sky.

Topic:   REVISED EDITION. COMMONS
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May 27, 1921

Mr. COCKSHUTT:

Towers are a great mark for lightning, and we would not like to see a thunderbolt strike the tower of the Dominion House of Commons; that would be a calamity. I have no doubt that the minister has warned all those concerned that the first requisite is safety, and I hope that that is the policy that will be pursued in building the tower. So far as the committee is concerned, I think those that have had to do with it have given us excellent value. I do not know what my hon. friend from Pontiac (Mr. Cahill) is accustomed to over the river, when he says that part of this building might be used for housing cattle. This

building appears to me to be on very generous proportions, and all the appliances are of the best, and quite as good, I think, as hon. members are accustomed to in their own home town, if not a little better. Therefore, I think, we ought to be well satisfied, and I hope that the building will be completed in as good a fashion as the work has been done up to date.

Topic:   REVISED EDITION. COMMONS
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May 27, 1921

Mr. COCKSHUTT:

I understand that a little under $9,000,000 has been expended on this building, and I heard the hon. member for Brome (Mr. McMaster) say that that was a very lavish expenditure. Personally, I think we have got very good value indeed in this building, as building goes nowadays. I visited the province of Manitoba only a few months ago and went through their building, which is to accommodate only a comparatively few members compared with ours, being a building for one province only with a comparatively small population, yet that building has cost almost as much as this.

Topic:   REVISED EDITION. COMMONS
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May 23, 1921

Mr. COCKSHUTT:

My hon. friend, I

am sure, does not wish to mislead anyone, but I certainly think that his remarks will have that effect. If his contention is correct, that the consumer in Canada will pay this particular duty, does not the consumer in the United States also pay the duty- my hon. friend calls it a duty or a tax- which is charged on invoices of goods shipped from Canada to the United States? Surely my hon. friend will not argue that, if the consumer in the United States does not pay the tax that is charged on invoices of goods shipped from Canada across the

line, the consumer in Canada will pay the $2.50 levied from the American exporter before he sends his goods over here.

Topic:   REVISED EDITION. COMMONS
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May 23, 1921

Mr. COCKSHUTT:

Topic:   REVISED EDITION. COMMONS
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