Peter Robert MCGIBBON

MCGIBBON, Peter Robert

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Argenteuil (Quebec)
Birth Date
January 14, 1854
Deceased Date
December 18, 1921
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Robert_McGibbon
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=493aa226-db5b-4eff-854d-21fbed53bcca&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lumberman

Parliamentary Career

December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
L LIB
  Argenteuil (Quebec)
December 6, 1921 - December 18, 1921
LIB
  Argenteuil (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 14)


May 22, 1934

Mr. McGIRBON:

I suppose I should apologize to those who have reached that age, but statisticians say that their value to the country is nil. I should like now to draw the attention of hon. members to the wastage I have mentioned.

Statisticians tell us that two per cent of our population are continuously nil. That two per cent at a reasonable salary, which I have

put down as $1,000 per year, indicates an annual loss through preventable sickness of $180,000,000. I submit that that is a considerable sum, especially when we realize that a great deal of this loss could be prevented. We have continuously ill 54,000 adult males and 54,000 adult females, making a total of 108,000. Taking an average wage of $2,500 for the males and $1,000 for the females we have an annual loss or wastage in earning power due to sickness of $189,000,000. If we add to that, as we must, medical care and hospitalization at $19 each per year we find we have another $2,052,000 added to the wastage.

Topic:   HOSPITAL SWEEPSTAKES
Subtopic:   BILL TO LEGALIZE LOTTERIES WHEN CONDUCTED BY PROVINCES
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May 27, 1929

Mr. McGEBBON:

In view of the statement made by the Minister of Railways, should not the government obtain the assistance of competent authorities in order that that question may be decided before such a huge expenditure is made?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
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March 28, 1928

Mr. McGTBBON:

The Minister of Justice says, "hear, hear," I agree with him to this extent, that we should not be held responsible for any treaties to which we are not a party and about which we have not been consulted, but for the life of me I cannot see how this country is going to go on as a nation within a nation, so to speak, a nation within the British Empire, and not to some extent at least share the responsibilities of that empire. I think the time is coming, and it must inevitably come, as pointed out by Sir Robert Borden during the war and during the imperial conferences following the war, when we must have joint responsibility as well as joint freedom of action. One must go with the other, and if we are going to work for peace, I agree with those who have said here this afternoon that the greatest agency for peace in the world to-day, or that has ever existed in the world, is the British Empire, and if this country is desirous of securing the peace of the world, there is the channel along which we should work. I say again that in my opinion if the British Empire as a whole had got behind the Locarno pact, that action would have been one of the greatest influences for the peace of Europe and one of the greatest opportunities to work for peace that has ever been presented in my time at least.

The hon. member for Southeast Grey (Miss Macphail) says that she is opposed to force, or at least I inferred that from her remarks. I had in my hand yesterday, although I have mot got it at the moment, an extract from one of her speeches delivered in. the city of Regina in which she said that the only thing to do with this government was to take it by the throat and hold it up against the wall and make it do things. I wonder if that requires any force, or is this government so weak, metaphorically speaking, that all you have to do is to threaten it and it will collapse.

I have a great deal of sympathy, Mr. Speaker, with the Minister of National Defence (Mr. Ralston). He is a man whom I think we all respect and admire, and those who know him best, I believe, think the most of him. I have a great deal of sympathy with him in the position in which he finds himself. He is administering a responsible department, and he has practically on two or three sides of him a hostile following. Although he is not in the house at the moment, I want to assure him that in any reasonable measures he takes towards perfecting that department and bringing it up to standard, so to speak, so that it will be ready for any emergency that may come-and God forbid that it may come-he will have my support.

56103-114i

I believe that as a self-respecting nation we should make adequate preparation for any emergency that may overtake us. I hope that this parliament will never again exhibit the spectacle that it presented before the outbreak of war, when speaker after speaker in this house got up and ridiculed the possibility of this country ever 'being drawn into a European war.

So far as the participation of Canada is concerned, I do not think there is any danger of this country having to send troops out of Canada without the sanction of parliament. I believe from the facts that it would be absolutely impossible. I think the Prime Minister will agree with me that should any such emergency arise, there would be no money available for the purpose of sending out troops, and consequently parliament would have to be called and the money voted before any such action could be taken. But I do think that this and any other self-respecting country should lay the foundations sufficiently well that around a skeleton of a military defence organization we could build up the forces neceossary for self-protection in time of emergency.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   INTERNATIONAL PEACE
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April 13, 1926

Mr. McGLBBON:

Some years ago I got

some information in regard to these annuities and found out that a man could obtain a great income if he invested his money in government bonds. Furthermore, he would have something to bequeath on his death. There must be something wrong in connection with the government annuities scheme, because the annuities are not selling as they should. I should like the minister to look into that.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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March 18, 1926

Mr. McGEBBON:

Before the minister

leaves that subject, I should like to bring to his attention the inconvenience that Canadian citizens often have to suffer when returning from a visit to the United States. I would call his attention particularly to the action of his officials at Bridgeburg. In the last year or two I have had to 4 p.m. bring to the notice of the department a number of occasions when Canadian citizens have been detained in a

Supply-Customs

rather high-handed and ruthless manner by the officials and put to a great deal of inconvenience. Perhaps he will inform the committee what instructions his officials have in that regard?

Topic:   LIST OF OFFICES AND SUB-OFFICES IN ONTARIO FROM WHICH VESSELS ARRIVE AND DEPART
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