Onésiphore TURGEON

TURGEON, The Hon. Onésiphore, B.A.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Gloucester (New Brunswick)
Birth Date
September 6, 1849
Deceased Date
November 18, 1944
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onésiphore_Turgeon
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=5afbdf71-2ff3-4501-b9b3-74750bfc73ee&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
editor, journalist

Parliamentary Career

November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
LIB
  Gloucester (New Brunswick)
November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Gloucester (New Brunswick)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  Gloucester (New Brunswick)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  Gloucester (New Brunswick)
December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
L LIB
  Gloucester (New Brunswick)
December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
LIB
  Gloucester (New Brunswick)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 76)


June 16, 1922

Mr. TURGEON:

As I said a few moments ago in some of the minor positions in the service the responsibility is not large neither does any large amount of money pass through the hands of the office holder. On the other hand in the case of the customs service many officers become the custodians of very large sums. Such a man is under the supervision of his member, to use an expression that is quite common in the country constituencies; he is under the supervision of the man who formerly was responsible for his appointment and therefore he conducts himself with great circumspection. Now the action of the late government in bringing the Outside Service under the control of the Civil Service Commission was done without serious consideration, and is not likely to commend itself to the people when they think over the present situation. The government which is charged with the responsibility of looking after the larger interests of the country should be in a position to care for the smaller interests as well. Because, after all, it is very often the small things which play an important part in the happiness and prosperity of the people. In closing let me say that I think I have given utterance to nothing that is opposed to the principles of true democracy.

Topic:   EDITION
Full View Permalink

June 16, 1922

Mr. TURGEON:

Well perhaps my hon.

friend is right. But chances will come and the party of the hon. member (Mr. Mc-Quarrie) will have its turn.

Topic:   EDITION
Full View Permalink

June 16, 1922

Mr. TURGEON:

We have very few officials of the Department of Agriculture in my constituency or in the province of New Brunswick, but I believe it applies to that department also.

Topic:   EDITION
Full View Permalink

June 16, 1922

Mr. TURGEON:

In 1911, there were only eight or ten Liberal constituencies in Ontario, and the ministers representing the province of Ontario took good care to keep their friends in office. That accounts for the comparatively small number of dismissals in Ontario. In 1919, this same government that dismissed these officials after 1911, thinking that they had their op-pointees nominated all over the country and the outside service filled with their supporters, brought the outside service under the commission in order to keep their appointees in the service. That is what was done. I protested at the time, and I am only repeating to-night what I said two or three years ago in this Parliament. I say that in the -best interests of the country, in the interests of the Civil Service, and more particularly for the sake of economy, for which my hon. friend from Marquette has made such a strong appeal, the responsibility for making appointments should be with the memibers of Parliament, whose duty it is to accept that responsibility. I am prepared to take the responsibility. If I have made a mistake and a man has been appointed who is not doing his duty, could I let that man stay in office? No, I would be the first to ask for his dismissal in the interests of the service. The outside service is not in the same position as the inside service, which has responsible heads. In the departmental offices here in Ottawa all the clerks are under the different heads. If a clerk does not know enough of his arithmetic or of his grammar-which is all that is required most of the time-the deputy minister or his chief puts him out-

Some hori. MEMBERS: Oh, no.

Topic:   EDITION
Full View Permalink

June 16, 1922

Mr. TURGEON:

The commission has

lately stated that it might be well if appointments to positions involving a salary under $200 were recommended by the member for the county. It may not have been so intended, but I look upon that as the greatest insult that could be offered to the representatives of the people in Parliament. It is an insult for a member of Parliament to be told that he is not fit to make appointments carrying a salary of over $200. I see the ex-Minister of Agriculture in his seat. It is an insult to him and hon. gentlemen opposite just as much as it is to me. If I am not qualified to nominate a man for a position worth $1,000 or $2,000, I do not want to choose a man for a position worth $200. My hon. friends of the Progressive party, led by my hon. friend from Marquette, say, let us do away with patronage, but in ten years' time they may find that the public service in the prairie provinces has been degraded because no responsibility for it attaches to members of Parliament, and before that time comes, it will have cost millions of dollars to the country. If a member is not willing to accept this responsibility, let him not seek to be elected to Parliament. He is the only one who can be held to account for the proper carrying on of the public service in his constituency, and he should be ready to accept that responsibility. This same Government that after 1911 put out every public official in the Dominion of Canada who was a Liberal or Liberal appointee-[DOT] and they cannot deny that, every such official was dismissed, and the only exceptions in my county were the postmasters in five or six places where there were no Conservatives in existence-

Topic:   EDITION
Full View Permalink