William Pate MULOCK

MULOCK, The Hon. William Pate, P.C., Q.C.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
York North (Ontario)
Birth Date
July 8, 1897
Deceased Date
August 25, 1954
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Pate_Mulock
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=5c6d13ed-6be7-40bb-aa19-642b489d17de&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
fruit grower, lawyer

Parliamentary Career

September 24, 1934 - August 14, 1935
LIB
  York North (Ontario)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  York North (Ontario)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
LIB
  York North (Ontario)
  • Postmaster General (July 8, 1940 - June 8, 1945)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 148)


June 11, 1951

Mr. Mulock:

That is correct. The postage has

not been raised. But my colleague the Minister of Finance has required extra money for the war expenditure. It'was estimated that something upwards of $8 million could be raised by an additional one cent on letters and post cards. It was not that the Post Office Department required more money for operating. In fact our surplus as shown in the report has increased substantially in the last few years, from some $3,250 to upward of $4,500,000, with every indication that it will be still higher, although the final figures for the fiscal year are not yet in.

The point I wish to make is that when the postage on letters was boosted first from two cents to three cents, and then later to

Post Office Act

four cents it was made clear by the Postmaster General and by the minister of finance of that day that that four cents was not all postage; it was two cents postage and two cents tax for purposes of war revenue. Today, without much notice being paid to it, we have had laid before us a proposal which builds that two cents, which has been on during these years as a matter of tax, into the postage rate structure. It may be that increased costs make this change necessary. It may be that the idea of penny postage, in view of what has happened to the value of money, is gone. But I felt that before we passed this last section we should know what we are doing. We are changing the basis of our four cent postage rate from what it has been for years, two cents postage and two cents tax, to four cents postage-

Topic:   II, 1951
Full View Permalink

August 12, 1944

Mr. MULOCK:

I shall be glad to give the general idea, but I have not disclosed that information, so far as particulars are concerned, to any hon. members.

Topic:   POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
Full View Permalink

August 12, 1944

Mr. MULOCK:

Some time ago we completed a check-up and investigation of post office facilities right across this country.

Supply-Post Office

and recommendations have been made for post-war construction of post offices and improvements, not only to the buildings but to provide better working conditions for our staffs. I do not think that at this time I should go into any particulars. The hon. member will understand that if I mentioned one place and another was not mentioned there would be a certain amount of pressure that some things should be done immediately. A programme has been arrived at which we consider is in the interest of the post office service, according to the best judgment of the senior officials of the department, after discussing the matter with me on many occasions.

Topic:   POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
Full View Permalink

August 12, 1944

Mr. MULOCK:

In some cases when men are fulfilling extra duties supplements are given in addition. Some of them have gone through; others have been recommended by the department and are under consideration by the treasury board. I agree with the hon. member when he says that the men have had added responsibilities and added work. He realizes that that cannot be entirely avoided. Inexperienced men cannot deliver mail efficiently. They have to learn their route; they have to learn the system. Experienced men are carrying a big share of the load. When increases come along I am glad to know that we are appreciative of what they are doing. They have helped out and have taken on those added duties because they know they are necessary. We have a large number of men who are in different branches of the armed service-some are on loan to other departments of the government-during this war. I wish to say that I appreciate the service that the men have given right across this country and the spirit they have shown. I refer not only to the men in the civil service but also to the postmasters in the small offices across Canada who help in every way they can and who cooperate in taking on more duties frequently without charge to the public treasury.

Topic:   POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
Full View Permalink

August 12, 1944

Hon. W. P. MULOCK (Postmaster General):

With regard to the first question asked by the hon. member, I would say that some years ago the economy committee recommended that a change should be made in the method of setting out the post offices in the report. From a departmental point, of view it was found to be more convenient to list the post offices in alphabetical order rather than to follow the old system. However, in view of what the hon. member has said I shall be glad to reconsider the matter and discuss it with him.

In regard to the second matter, as soon as it was brought to my attention the district directors in all postal districts were advised that such action was incorrect, and it would be considered that if postmasters or postmistresses took such a course of action, they would be guilty of political interference if they did it for any party and would be liable to be dismissed for that reason. I think it has been made quite clear to them that that suggestion should not be followed by them unless they wish to place their positions in jeopardy.

Topic:   POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
Full View Permalink