Jacques BUREAU

BUREAU, The Hon. Jacques, P.C., K.C., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Three Rivers and St. Maurice (Quebec)
Birth Date
July 9, 1860
Deceased Date
January 23, 1933
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_Bureau
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=61c189fb-d551-49ed-82da-cc777b86b056&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
LIB
  Three Rivers and St. Maurice (Quebec)
November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Three Rivers and St. Maurice (Quebec)
  • Solicitor General of Canada (February 14, 1907 - October 6, 1911)
February 28, 1907 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Three Rivers and St. Maurice (Quebec)
  • Solicitor General of Canada (February 14, 1907 - October 6, 1911)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  Three Rivers and St. Maurice (Quebec)
  • Solicitor General of Canada (February 14, 1907 - October 6, 1911)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  Three Rivers and St. Maurice (Quebec)
  • Solicitor General of Canada (February 14, 1907 - October 6, 1911)
December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
L LIB
  Three Rivers and St. Maurice (Quebec)
December 6, 1921 - January 2, 1922
LIB
  Three Rivers and St. Maurice (Quebec)
  • Minister of Customs and Excise (December 29, 1921 - September 4, 1925)
January 19, 1922 - September 5, 1925
LIB
  Three Rivers and St. Maurice (Quebec)
  • Minister of Customs and Excise (December 29, 1921 - September 4, 1925)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1166 of 1167)


May 1, 1903

Mr. BUREAU.

Last year we loaded ninety-six ocean steamers at Three Rivers.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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May 1, 1903

Mr. BUREAU.

It is estimated that 3,000,000 logs will be floated down that river this season. This dredging is to remove the sand bars which have formed, and which would otherwise prevent the logs being floated down.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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April 3, 1903

Mr. BUREAU.

It costs $3.75 per light per year at Three Rivers, where there is abundant water power.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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April 18, 1901

Mr. JACQUES BUREAU (Three Rivers and St. Maurice).

I have listened, Mr. Speaker, with great interest to this debate, which is certainly one of the most important that we have ever had in this House, and I cannot allow it to close without making a few suggestions which, as a representative of Three Rivers, I deem it my duty to offer. After listening to the discussion, I have come to the conclusion that we are all agreed on one point. We are all agreed that the St. Lawrence river ought to be our main avenue for exporting our commodities to the old world. Some hon. members have contended that this route requires considerable improvements, but the hon. the Minister of Marine says that it is in very good order. The question now seems to be, where shall we locate the head of deep water navigation, and what improvement should we make in that port. It has been said that most of the grain raised on the western plains goes to American ports.

Now, if the St. Lawrence river is in good order, how is it that western grain does not come to our ports for export. The only conclusion must be-which is the fact-that our ports are not properly equipped for the loading of steamers or for the receiving of grain. But we must also bear in mind that wheat is not the only export of our great Dominion. We must bear in mind that of late years new industries have been begun and new resources developed. We must bear in mind that, for instance, in the riding I represent, within the last four or five years, millions of dollars have been invested in the industry of pulp or paper. Now that that is being done, we ought to look to the best interests of the whole community and apportion the improvement of our harbours, so that Canada at large will benefit. There seems to be a kind of rivalry between Montreal and Quebec. That seems to be an old feud. If I remember well, history shows us that when the question came before the people of locating the capital of the Dominion the same feud broke out and, as the result the capital came to Ottawa. Now, I want to offer a compromise ; I want to offer a port located half-way between Quebec and Montreal, a seaport that is at the lower end of Lake St. Peter. If you want to make it the national port, you are welcome to do so, and you will save the dredging of Lake St. Peter, which seems to be a matter of a good deal of anxiety to economical members of this House. All hon. members know where Three Rivers is located, at the mouth of the St. Maurice. There is no dredging to do. When the ships go up from the ocean to Montreal or down from Montreal to the ocean, they come within 50 or 60 feet of our docks. Now, in Three Rivers we have had new industries developed. This year there will be cut in the St. Maurice region about 3,000.000 logs. These will be sawn into deals or into pulp wood, or turned into pulp and paper, and sent across the ocean. Now, of all the in-

dustries, the only share we get in Three Rivers is 10 per cent, according to the report of our harbour commissioners, dated as late as January, 1901. Why is this ? Because we have not the dockage facilities that will allow us to take these products which are manufactured within twenty-one miles of deep water and bring them to Three Rivers for export. Ninety per cent of these products must go to the harbour of Montreal or to the harbour of Quebec and crowd these harbours, and make it more difficult to handle the freight that comes there. As has been stated, distance cuts no figure now, it is time that we look to, and time is gained by the facility with wdiich you can handle trade. Everybody knows that the more you handle bulky freight the more it costs. If we had money to develop the port of Three Rivers so that we could provide for our own demands and export what is produced within a radius of 80 miles, including the $2,000,000 worth of pulp and paper manufactured by the Lau-rentide Pulp Company, of Grand Mere, and also the paper that will be manufactured by the Belgo-Canadian Company, the port of Montreal would be relieved. Moreover, the manufacturer would work at a less cost, because, instead of a transport of 127 miles, he would have only 27 miles to get to deep water. Another thing is that these people use material which they must import. They use coal, they use brimstone and marble : and the want of proper accommodation at Three Rivers makes it necessary that these things should come by way of Quebec and Montreal, encumbering the docks there, and making the handling of freight more difficult. There Is another trade I wish to refer to ; and my hon. friend from the St. Lawrence division of Montreal (Mr. Bicker-dike), in spite of his love for Montreal, will bear me out in what I say with regard to it. I refer to the cattle trade. At Three Rivers we have no tide, and we have a fine prairie which is used as a grazing ground. We can bring the cattle to Three Rivers, get them out of the cars, turn them out on the grazing ground and get them in good condition and then put them back on the ship for export. There is no place better located for the export of cattle than the port of Three Rivers. When I talk on this line, I always talk of these ports as summer ports. Now, taking this other line of argument that, by saving these new industries that are being developed on freight expenses, we are helping our producers, the men who cut down the trees that produce the pulp wood, pulp or paper. The freight that these corporations have to pay they must charge up to somebody, and generally it is the man who has to work to produce these articles that gets his wages diminished in proportion to the increase the trade have to pay for their export. It has been stated in this House that this is a non-political question, that it is a patriotic question.

Topic:   SUPPLY-THE TRAN SPORT ATION QUESTION.
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April 18, 1901

Mr. BUREAU.

Then, as a patriot and not as a politician, I would like to call the attention of the House to Three Rivers, and I state that it is in the interests of the whole Dominion to develop that port to facilitate the export of cattle, paper, pulp and pulp wood from Three Rivers. I wished to show the advantages of Three Rivers so that there may be no surprise if I go to my hon. friend the Minister of Public Works and ask him if he will put something in the estimates to help to develop this great port which I hope, in the near future, will commend itself to the attention of this House.

Topic:   SUPPLY-THE TRAN SPORT ATION QUESTION.
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