Henry Alfred MULLINS

MULLINS, The Hon. Henry Alfred

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Marquette (Manitoba)
Birth Date
August 27, 1861
Deceased Date
July 8, 1952
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Mullins
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=6aec5fc3-848c-47c3-b70d-cae7c56afa99&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
exporter, farmer

Parliamentary Career

October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
CON
  Marquette (Manitoba)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Marquette (Manitoba)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 83)


April 10, 1935

Mr. MULLINS:

-and he took a lot of

money from the people of Medicine Hat. I do not think he was in the Swift Current district but he operated at Medicine Hat and he was a failure, just like the man they imported named Sapiro. All these novices have been imported in the west, but the spirit of the old pioneer will prevail. My hon. friend is one of the pioneers and I always like to shake hands with him. We have faced the elements, we have fought drought before, and we have asked nothing from anybody. I say therefore that the same spirit will bring that country back. I would not waste any money unnecessarily until we see what the conditions really are. I have lived out there and I believe that this will be a wet year.

Topic:   REHABILITATION OF DROUGHT AREAS
Subtopic:   DEMONSTRATION AREAS AND INVESTIGATIONAL
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March 29, 1935

Mr. MULLINS:

It happened to be my privilege to go through these camps, and I am at a loss to understand hon. members opposite. If they have never been through relief camps I would advise them to go and observe the conditions. The statement I am about to make can be borne out by the hon. member for Kenora-Rainy River who, I believe, is in his seat. While in his section of the country I visited a camp at Vermilion Bay, and I can

225S

Supply-Defence-Relief Camps

assure hon. members that the conditions in that camp were better than the conditions which existed in Camp Hughes from 1915 to 1918. I would like to tell hon. members opposite that when I entered the cookhouse door I saw a huge pan of doughnuts of the very best quality sitting on the stove and being prepared for supper. The hon. member for Vancouver South took exception to an article I read a short time ago. This evening I should like to make a correction concerning that letter which, on that occasion, I indicated was from a young man in one of the camps. The letter I have before me at this time states:

You can certainly tell Mr. Maclnnis that everything the boy said was perfectly true and I have been away from there six months or more. Apparently after reading Mr. Maelnnis's speeches he could never have had much experience with the interior decoration of a bunk-house. The boy was mistaken in so far as the horse blankets are concerned. They are not horse blankets; they are regulation army issue.

The family said after I came back to Winnipeg that I was spoiled in so far as my eats are concerned. When I read the speeches in there I simply could not stop sending you this letter. I hope you are in the best of health.

I have another letter here from the superintendent of a park that has 650 men in one of these camps; they get nothing but the very best. There must be something wrong with my hon. friends over on the other side of the house. They must be saying these things for some purpose. At the camp at Vermilion, for instance, and I am sure the hon. member for that district will bear me out in this statement, the men are fed the very best, are housed the very best, and are living under the very best conditions. Of course it is a camp; it is not the Royal York hotel or the Chateau Laurier. What do you expect? If it is any information for the hon. gentleman, personally I would turn these men loose and tell them to go out to work. There is plenty of work for them on the land. The farmers in my constituency are asking for them. I just got a letter to-day from a farmer in my constituency who offered one of these men 830 a month. I know that farmer very well, and I know he would treat the man well, but the man stayed with him just one day. He left because the farmer called him for breakfast at six-thirty in the morning. These men are spoiled, and if you keep on pampering them and feeding them with the very best of food, such as the minister gives them, you will never get rid of them. Turn them out and let them work the same as we had to do as pioneers. Those of us who were out

west in the early days never got such pampering nor lived under such good conditions. I do not know the object of hon. gentlemen who are making these complaints, but I have my own idea. If they will go into the camps and see the conditions I am sure they will change their minds. I have been through the camps at Vancouver and New Westminster, and I did not see anything to complain of. The hon. member for New Westminster is in his seat, and he knows very well that these men are well fed and that everything is all right. There is nothing wrong in the camps. They are comfortable and everything is of the very best, unless conditions have changed since I visited them not long ago. I certainly would recommend that hon. gentlemen go through the camps and look at them for themselves unbiased, and then I am sure they will come to the same conclusion that I have come to.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
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March 28, 1935

Mr. MULLINS:

Where did the hon. member get those figures?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
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March 28, 1935

Mr. MULLINS:

That is my old ranch and my costs were never that high.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
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March 13, 1935

Mr. MULLINS:

It is very interesting for me to listen this afternoon to the statements made here. As I look over the house and see practical farmers smiling at the advocacy of a six hour day by my late spiritual adviser the hon. member for Winnipeg North Centre, I cannot understand it. How can farm work be confined to six hours a day, and what use is it to talk about two shifts for milking?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   EIGHT HOUR DAY
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