Douglas Mason FISHER

FISHER, Douglas Mason, B.A., B.L.S., D.Lit.

Personal Data

Party
New Democratic Party
Constituency
Port Arthur (Ontario)
Birth Date
September 19, 1919
Deceased Date
September 18, 2009
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doug_Fisher_(politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=6e0e7dad-52e6-426d-b6d7-f3a4924ce2de&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
columnist, journalist, librarian, teacher

Parliamentary Career

June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
CCF
  Port Arthur (Ontario)
March 31, 1958 - April 19, 1962
CCF
  Port Arthur (Ontario)
August 3, 1961 - April 19, 1962
NDP
  Port Arthur (Ontario)
June 18, 1962 - February 6, 1963
NDP
  Port Arthur (Ontario)
April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
NDP
  Port Arthur (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 5 of 852)


June 17, 1965

Mr. Fisher:

Let the Parliamentary Secretary tell us about the automobile trade industry and the consequences that might affect periodicals in this particular area.

Income Tax Act

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
Full View Permalink

June 17, 1965

Mr. Fisher:

No.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
Full View Permalink

June 17, 1965

Mr. Fisher:

Get it printed in Hansard.

Topic:   AGRICULTURE
Subtopic:   FEED GRAINS-SPEECH BY FORESTRY MINISTER RESPECTING WHEAT BOARD
Full View Permalink

June 17, 1965

Mr. Fisher:

-the hon. Member for Essex East if he is not aware that in the automobile trade in both Windsor and Detroit there is a common interest in publications and periodicals. I think this is obvious. As I believe many hon. Members will know, a number of publications are shared jointly by the trade where advertising is very important, and if the Canadian parts manufacturers are going to be entering into the Canadian market, and vice versa, and we are going to get this interplay and interpenetration in this industry, one would assume there would be tremendous advantages in having periodicals, weeklies and monthlies, that relate to the trade, with all

Customs Tariff

the information for the trade including franchises, bids, tenders and all the other things that are of common interest. This is one of the assumptions the Government should consider as naturally following the automotive trade arrangement. Yet here we are setting up in the Customs Tariff a series of blocks to any development of that kind.

[DOT] (9:30 p.m.)

Although I have more substantial comments to make on this particular paragraph this seems to me to be an anomaly, the kind of paradox we keep encountering with this particular government and Minister of Finance in office-on the one hand Canadian nationalism, the Canadian Development Corporation, the cry "Let us save our Canadian insurance companies and banks"; and on the other hand the naturalization of Time and Reader's Digest. Let us intermix our automotive industry, but block off any normal kind of trade communications and channels which link them up.

I do not want an explanation of the paradoxes because we know that this is part of the character of the Government. At times we can swallow it a little better. It is like having castor oil with a lot of syrup administered by the hon. Member for Essex East, with his own particular kind of circumlocution, which makes us feel that it is not really as bad as we thought. But we have a situation where the Minister of Finance in one year and in one budget does not want any part of Time or Reader's Digest but passes it over to the Prime Minister; and then this year he changes to this kind of nationalism, at the same time resorting to another kind in connection with life insurance, banks and the Canadian Development Corporation, which makes us a little annoyed and discouraged at the over-all approach which the Government has to these matters.

Paragraph 5 seems to me to have no real planning for the future in terms of certain developments which might take place. I should like the Parliamentary Secretary to note that not too long ago a number of representatives of the churches which put out publications held an annual meeting in Ottawa and lobbied the Government from the point of view that their publications deserved and merited Government advertisements. It is apparent that in the field of religious publications both in Canada and the United States a tremendous effort is being made to put these publications on a commercial basis, so that they have the income to improve their

June 17, 1965

Customs Tariff

editorial content, to get their circulation up, and so on. There is nothing regrettable about this particular trend, but I would point out that religious publications are specifically exempted under this particular item.

I assume that if the same step is being taken by religious publications in the United States which is developing here, then it is quite conceivable that, for example, a publication which generally appealed to fundamentalists, those in the fundamentalist churches or the Lutheran churches, could reach the stage in terms of circulation drive and editorial content which would be quite considerable. All you need do is look at the "Lutheran Hour" on television to realize the potential. I am not saying that the "Lutheran Hour" is commercial, but when this kind of body produces a publication with a commercial base it is conceivable in this area that you would have something which would attract Canadian advertising revenue and also advertisers of United States corporations with Canadian subsidiaries. This is something both feasible and possible, given the present trends which we have.

One of the other points I want to make with regard to the exemptions made here is this. There is the whole question of catalogues. What about coin magazines which, in effect, are catalogues? What about the number of agencies selling long playing records, or books, on the basis of a catalogue circulated on a regular basis? Quite often, as all hon. Members know, these publications include on the frontispiece or at the back, or occasionally in inserts, general advertising in connection with the trade. If that particular kind of catalogue is exempt, it seems to me it offers an obvious vehicle for circumventing what seems to me the intent of the legislation.

Included in this particular item is the following definition:

For the purpose of this Item,

(a) "issue" includes a special annual issue, and

(b) "periodical" means a periodical, the issues of which, other than special annual issues, are published at regular intervals of more than 6 days and less than 15 weeks and are distributed as issues of a distinct publication or as a supplement to more than one newspaper, but does not include

(i) a catalogue,

(ii) a newspaper, or

(iii) a periodical, the principal function of which is the encouragement, promotion or development of the fine arts, letters, scholarship or religion.

One other point in connection with these exceptions relate to special issues of Life magazine which are completely devoted to

something like fine arts, or special editions of magazines like Esquire. I interpret from the terms both of the budget resolution which was put through earlier and from this resolution that if a magazine like Esquire or Holiday has a special issue devoted, say, to Canada-

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
Full View Permalink

June 17, 1965

Mr. Fisher:

And automobiles. Mr. Chairman, I would like to ask-

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
Full View Permalink