Paul Theodore HELLYER

HELLYER, The Hon. Paul Theodore, P.C., B.A., F.R.S.A.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Trinity (Ontario)
Birth Date
August 6, 1923
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Hellyer
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=6ffdccf5-fe20-4be5-b99d-1593863458ac&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
author, builder, businessman, engineer, merchant

Parliamentary Career

June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  Davenport (Ontario)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Davenport (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of National Defence (February 9, 1956 - April 12, 1957)
December 15, 1958 - April 19, 1962
LIB
  Trinity (Ontario)
June 18, 1962 - February 6, 1963
LIB
  Trinity (Ontario)
April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
LIB
  Trinity (Ontario)
  • Minister of National Defence (April 22, 1963 - September 18, 1967)
November 8, 1965 - April 23, 1968
LIB
  Trinity (Ontario)
  • Minister of National Defence (April 22, 1963 - September 18, 1967)
  • Minister of Transport (September 19, 1967 - April 19, 1968)
  • Minister of Transport (April 20, 1968 - April 29, 1969)
June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
LIB
  Trinity (Ontario)
  • Minister of Transport (April 20, 1968 - April 29, 1969)
May 21, 1971 - September 1, 1972
IND
  Trinity (Ontario)
July 25, 1972 - September 1, 1972
PC
  Trinity (Ontario)
October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
PC
  Trinity (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1430 of 1432)


April 26, 1950

Mr. Hellyer:

-and elaborate on the minister's policy of consistent budgeting, but there are certain reasons why I should not. First of all, some of the people who need it most are not at present sitting in the house; and the second reason, and probably the most cogent, is the fact that I am not going to have enough time to do so.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Full View Permalink

April 26, 1950

Mr. Hellyer:

The financial critic of the Progressive Conservative party, the hon. member for Greenwood (Mr. Macdonnell), made a statement which I found most interesting. He mentioned the freedom that has brought us as far as we have come. I believe that is worthy of consideration. At the same time the leader of the opposition (Mr. Drew) recently made the statement, during a comment on a speech made by some other hon. member opposite, that he thought the situation could be handled by the same processes we have always used; by carrying on with exactly the same methods and techniques that we had used during the past generations and decades. Unfortunately, I do not believe that is true, and I know that the . Minister of Finance (Mr. Abbott) does not think it is true or he would not have initiated this consistent policy which has been called cyclical budgeting; you can call it what you like.

The first great reason why it is not so and why the leader of the opposition is not on solid ground is that some of what he calls the natural laws no longer apply in our economy. What have been referred to as

booms are usually artificial booms; and busts are, by the same definition, in many respects artificial too. I have not the time to go into the background of this; but, as you all know, in ancient days most of the economies were of the nature of one or two products; and if you had a natural failure, by immediate consequence you then had a depressed state. There has been a gradual tendency away from this and we have developed exceedingly complex societies, complex economic relationships, and a degree of specialization of labour which was never previously dreamed of. If you average all the cycles, all the moods of men, all the lack of rain in one area of the country offset by rain in the other, you find that the potential production of a diversified economy like our own does not change a great deal from one year to the next, except by natural increase.

The leader of the opposition would lead us to believe that if we just sort of let things go their own natural course-I think he might favour returning to the gold standard or something-it would all right itself and pretty soon we would have a new equilibrium which would have all of the necessary requirements to produce full employment and an extremely buoyant economy. Unfortunately this is not true either, and it is due to a natural process which has developed during the last two hundred years. We started with small industries. For natural reasons those have integrated and have become larger and larger for the sake of efficiency. Every year we have more industries, more products and more classes of produce in a category which could be said to be of a semi-rigid or rigid price nature. They are prices set by arbitrary decision and which do not obey the laws of supply and demand-one of the leader of the opposition's natural laws. A few years ago we had more commodities which fell in the natural price law category but the numbers are diminishing, and we now find ourselves in a complex economy in which we have a predominantly private enterprise, semi-rigid price structure. We still have some commodities in the free enterprise free competitive price category which obey the law of supply and demand.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Full View Permalink

April 26, 1950

Mr. Hellyer:

It covers enough to make sure that higher taxation would have been inevitable.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Full View Permalink

April 26, 1950

Mr. Hellyer:

And probably to make sure that there would be further extravagance and further expenditures; because some of the things I have looked over I am sure could not be justified on a self-liquidating basis, and certainly they would have been in a questionable category as far as extravagance is concerned.

National development is also in line with the minister's procedure of sound budgeting. At the present time projects are being carried forward as fast as they can be absorbed. If you read the forecast tabled in this house you will find that this year the capital expenditure will probably be the highest in the history of the Canadian economy. Most of it is relegated to two or three particular types of construction and development. Most of the things which hon. members opposite

1924 HOUSE OF

The Budget-Mr. Hellyer have suggested we should have done are things which would compete with the things being done, to the extent that the inflationary spiral would start again, with higher and higher prices; and you would be right back throwing at us the fact that things were getting out of hand and our money was being further depreciated, and so on.

The conclusion to these few remarks is,

I think, Mr. Speaker, that they do not know just what to ask for and do not know just what to complain about but because of their honourable status as His Majesty's loyal opposition they have to take some position. One day it is one position and another day it is the other position. But they are consistent in one fact: it is always some position.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Full View Permalink

April 26, 1950

Mr. Hellyer:

I had intended, Mr. Speaker, to make this a sort of full-blown economic debate-

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Full View Permalink