George Gibson COOTE

COOTE, George Gibson

Personal Data

Party
United Farmers of Alberta
Constituency
Macleod (Alberta)
Birth Date
August 18, 1880
Deceased Date
November 24, 1959
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Gibson_Coote
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=717ab1d6-e8dc-480c-aba9-4552f242369a&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
accountant, bank manager, farmer

Parliamentary Career

December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
PRO
  Macleod (Alberta)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
PRO
  Macleod (Alberta)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
UFA
  Macleod (Alberta)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
UFA
  Macleod (Alberta)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 662 of 662)


April 21, 1922

Mr. COOTE:

The minister has told us that tree cultivation is carried on to a small extent in several of the forest reserves. Yesterday and to-day we were told in discussing the agricultural estimates that to make agriculture permanent in some of the older settlements of the prairie provinces it was necessary to go into mixed farming. That is quite true, but there is something here that is of as great importance to agriculture in those areas as mixed farming, and that is the cultivation of trees. Has the minister

Supply-Interior

taken into consideration the advisability of demonstrating, not in the forest reserves, but out on the open prairie, what can be done in tree planting, and so encouraging the farmers to plant trees, because I am quite sure that in that direction lies the salvation of those areas to a great extent? It might be worth while for the department to start a plantation, to be extended from time to time, that would act as a shelter belt, and where the settlers might go for the purpose of securing young trees for use on their farms.

Topic:   SECOND READINGS
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April 21, 1922

Mr. COOTE:

I am quite aware that this work has been carried on, but the minister has possibly not quite grasped what I was driving at in regard to those plantations out on the bald prairies. What I suggest, and what in my humble opinion would be of very great value to the settlers there, would be a demonstration on those drought-stricken areas of what can actually be done. These settlers are in such condition financially that it is almost impossible for them to experiment in tree planting, and if any area could be set aside there for demonstration of what could be

10 p.m. accomplished in the way of tree growing, the results should be of great benefit to the settlers. It was brought out in the course of the discussion that these settlers might ultimately have to move out to other parts of the province.

Topic:   SECOND READINGS
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April 20, 1922

Mr. COOTE:

Is any part of this sum to he spent in a campaign to encourage the farmers to raise bacon hogs?

S up ply-A gricu Iture

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PENITENTIARY ACT AMENDMENT
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April 20, 1922

Mr. COOTE:

I wish to back up what

the hon. member for Lethbridge (Mr. Jel-liff) has just said regarding this matter. The constituency which I represent is bounded almost entirely on the west side by forest reserves, and the ranchers who live in that district, some of whom pasture their cattle on the reserves, are at certain times subjected to considerable losses from the depredations of timber Wolves. If the department can do anything to keep down these depredations, I think the money will be well spent. Indeed, I would suggest that if the hon. minister is hard pressed to find the money for this purpose he might well take it from the exhibition grants, which would be making a better use of the money.

I have had sent to me by a constituent a newspaper clipping which he has asked me to present to the House, and I think this is the proper time to do so. It is very much to the point and deals with the campaign for producing a certain type of hog. The discussion this afternoon has wandered over almost every phase of agricultural development, but there is no subject which would furnish more food for debate on these estimates than the hog. This article expresses a view which I feel should be brought before the House. It states, in part:

Will increased production cause a decrease in the price that will put the hog raiser where he has found himself several times before, following campaigns for greater production?

A factor in the building up of our overseas bacon trade which might bear looking into, in

view of the fact that governments in this country are advocating farmers to produce a particular kind of hog, and are therefore parties to the enterprise in a sense, is the manufacturing of bacon in this country. Much has been told regarding the production methods of Danish farmers. Might it not be too that the Danish packer has something on his Canadian competitor when it comes to the production of the kind of bacon the Old Country'trade requires? Possibly he has not and on the other hand he may. The matter is worth looking * into. Packers in this country are not any more likely to be the super-packers than are Canadian hog producers likely to be superior to the Danish-hog producer. We have been frequently told that our production methods are inferior, so often that we have come to regard it as a fact. It might not be a bad thing to look into the curing of bacon as well as into the producing of hogs. If the Danes know something about curing which our packers have not found out, if some of the quality of their finished product is due to better methods in curing and handling, it is important that our ipackers should know of it. Thus far in this country campaigns for the improvement of Canadian bacon have been confined to encouraging the production of a particular type of hog. Governments have been at this since the early nineties. Why not look into the curing business a little and see if better methods there might not accomplish something? We should be absolutely sure of our ground in all points connected with the problem, with the curing of bacon as well as the production of a particular type of hog.

An hon. member stated this afternoon something about the amount of money there is in hogs. One of my constituents gave me his experience when a similar statement was made to him. He said, "Certainly, I believe there is money in hogs. There is a bunch of hogs: I have put more money

in them than I can ever get out. So I am Quite satisfied there is money in hogs." I hope the hon. Minister of Agriculture will give some thought to the question of the curing as well as the production of bacon, because the farmer cannot cure the bacon; that is the work of the packer; and I think that maybe the packer needs education in curing bacon as much as the farmer does in producing the bacon hog.

At six o'clock the committee took recess

After Recess

The committee resumed -at eight o'clock.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PENITENTIARY ACT AMENDMENT
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April 3, 1922

Mr. COOTE:

There is an increase in travelling expenses from $75,000 to $85,000. Does the minister really think that his department is justified in asking for an increase of $10,000, particularly when we expect railway rates to come down? If any part of this $10,000 is to be incurred on trips to the Argentine or Chili, I think he should ask the Department of Trade and Commerce to reimburse him to that extent. I believe that we have trade commissioners in South America, and if the Department of Agriculture sends specialists there, it is only fair for the minister of that department to ask the Department of Trade and Commerce to shoulder that expense.

Topic:   SUPPLY-AGRICULTURE
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