William ROSS

ROSS, The Hon. William, P.C.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Victoria (Nova Scotia)
Birth Date
December 20, 1824
Deceased Date
March 17, 1912
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Ross_(Canadian_politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=77f3ef47-b5c7-41d9-832c-8b183c0ec1d2&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
merchant, shipbuilder

Parliamentary Career

September 20, 1867 - January 29, 1869
?
  Victoria (Nova Scotia)
January 30, 1869 - July 8, 1872
LIB
  Victoria (Nova Scotia)
October 12, 1872 - January 2, 1874
LIB
  Victoria (Nova Scotia)
  • Minister of Militia and Defence (November 7, 1873 - September 29, 1874)
December 20, 1873 - January 2, 1874
LIB
  Victoria (Nova Scotia)
  • Minister of Militia and Defence (November 7, 1873 - September 29, 1874)
January 22, 1874 - August 16, 1878
LIB
  Victoria (Nova Scotia)
  • Minister of Militia and Defence (November 7, 1873 - September 29, 1874)
November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
LIB
  Victoria (Nova Scotia)
May 18, 1905 - September 29, 1904
LIB
  Victoria (Nova Scotia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 97 of 98)


March 21, 1901

Mr. ROSS (South Ontario).

The hon. member for Cape Breton (Mr. Kendall) says there will be another million next year, and I presume he speaks only for his own county. In addition to that you know the untold wealth we possess in the Crow's Nest Pass, aud we learn from the literature that is sent us day by day that the possibilities of coal production in that region are not equalled in any place on the face of the globe. We may therefore expect the coal trade to increase enormously in the near future. In conversation with Mr. Rogers, who is the manager of the company, he told me how his company had spent hundreds of thousands of dollars in the pursuit of that industry. Some people may wonder how the coal industry in British Columbia would benefit eastern Canada, but there is no doubt that it helps to distribute wealth, because thousands of dollars are expended for the purchase of supplies in this part of Canada, and the wages paid the workingmen goes into circulation all over the Dominion. Again let us take our export of gold. In 1890 Wd exported $1,099,053 worth of gold, and in 1900 we exported $14,14S,-543 worth, showing an increase of $13,049,490. This is largely due, of course, to the opening up of the Yukon, and the government can well take a great deal of credit for the manner in which law and order has beefi maintained in that country, as well as for a good deal of the development and progress which has been made there. The government, of course, does not take credit for all this production of gold, but they can safely say that the manner in which they have preserved thd" peace of the country has en-aldW' thiiT large quantity of gold to be mimMl. arid further, that they have ached fRfJiifeh'ed all this without a cent of cost :to dhri older provinces. The tariff as applied there was that all the gold that came

out of the country was assessed 10 per cent, and now that the country is becoming more self-sustaining and the output larger, that royalty is to be reduced to 5 per cent. That is the principle of the tariff we advocate ; a tariff that will some day, I hope, become exactly a revenue tariff ; a tariff that will not bear harshly on any particular section of the community, while being a benefit to all. The product of our fisheries during these five years I have mentioned have increased only by $391,318, and the hon. gentleman from Halifax (Mr. Roche) has told us the reason of that. Take the products of the forest. The total exports of the products of the forest in 1890 amounted to $27,177,686, and in 1900 to $29,663,668, showing an increase of $2,487,982. That is not a very great increase. It is not so marked as in the products of the mines and some others of our exports, but it is large enough to show that the trade is in excellent condition, and that the exports are at a very high water mark. The next item, the export of animals and their products, affects the largest part of our community, and its condition is quite gratifying. In 1896 we exported live animals to the value of $11,426,667, and in 1900 to the value of $12,201,595, showing an increase of $774,928, notwithstanding the embargo which was placed against the shipment of our live cattle to England. The total export of provisions or products of animals in 1896 was $21,200,808 worth, and in 1900. $40,063,218, being an increase of $18,852,410. This increase was largely in our cheese, our bacon, and our pork products, and notwithstanding the fact that during the last year the quantity of cheese exported had decreased the value of it to us has been greater. Take agricultural products in grain. In 1896 we exported $14,083,361 worth, and in 1900 that had risen to $27,516,609, showing an increase during the five years of $13,433,248. This increase has been largely in wheat and coarse grains, and we hope soon to see our vast prairies of the west growing a still greater quantity of beautiful wheat, for which they are so justly celebrated, and which will be transported to the seaports by our Canadian national railways, and shipped to the old land, there to be made into the best bread the world can produce. Notwithstanding this wonderful development in our agricultural and natural products, which after all, are the main source of our wealth, the manufacturers of Canada during this time have not ceased to be active. The export of manufactured goods in 1896 amounted to $9,365,384 worth, and in 1900 it had increased to $14,224,287, being an increase during. the five years of $4,858,903, or nearly a million dollars a year. That, Sir, is very creditable for a young country like ours. There are many lines of manufactures in Canada which are

capable of extension for export purposes. Do we not see that every

country under the sun, having its own home market, is reaching out to the markets of other countries and endeavouring to increase their export trade. They want an oulet for the productions of the country ; and so we will help the manufacturers. Have we not the lumber, the' ore, the agricultural products ? Can we not turn our cattle into dressed beef ? Do we not grow wheat, and can we not turn it into flour ? These things can be exported either in the finished form or in the raw state. Of miscellaneous articles we exported in 1896 $109,265 worth, and in 1900, $208,070 worth, showing an increase of only $98,805. We come to the grand total of exports of the produce of Canada, and we find that they amounted in 1S96 to $109,915,337, and in 1900 to $170,642,369, showing in the five years during the reign of the party to which I am proud to belong an increase in our exports of $60,727,032. This is a record of which we ought to be proud ; and if I had no other justification, these figures are sufficient to justify me in asserting that the tariff which has been in force for the past four years has been for the benefit of our country.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-THE BUDGET.
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March 21, 1901

Mr. WM. ROSS (South Ontario).

Mr. Speaker, I know that I have no apology to make for standing here, but I crave your consideration and the indulgence of hon. members while, for a few minutes, I discuss the questions which are so vital to the interests of us all. I am extremely sorry that I cannot agree with the hon. member for Centre Toronto (Mr. Brock). We do agree on everything else but politics. I have the pleasure of buying his dry goods, and he sells good dry goods ; I have the pleasure of knowing him as a gentleman and a friend, and he is a good friend and a gentleman. But I must confess that I do not admire his politics, and in that we agree to disagree. When he says that this government have been faithless, that they have not kept their promises, that the party they represent is not worthy the consideration of this country, I disagree from him entirely. He tells about the Conservative party having the same old policy. It is the same old policy-and considering the wonderful development of the country for the last four years, that party is likely to

have the same old policy for many years to come. The hon. gentleman tells about the methods adopted in the last election in canvassing for votes in Ontario-that we went to the factories and promised that if the Liberal party was returned to power, there would be Increased protection, or something of that kind.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-THE BUDGET.
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March 18, 1901

Hon. Mr. BOSS (Victoria).

He will rise again. When you go down into the trough of the sea you will rise again to the top.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-THE BUDGET.
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March 8, 1901

Hon. Mr. ROSS (Victoria, N.S.) .

Our complaint in the province of Nova Seofia is that we have not sufficient dredges for the public works necessary to be done. We are quite prepared to build those dredges in that province, because, with the exception of the harbours of Yarmouth and St. John, in the province of New Brunswick, bucket dredges would not be suitable for our work. The kind we want in Nova Scotia, in the rough parts of our harbours and coasts, where there are a good many boulders on the bottom, is spoon dredges, and they can be built for $30,000 to $40,000 each. We would always have plenty of work for them. Some of those dredges have been built before in the province of Nova Scotia, and have done successful work, and I hope, therefore, that the Minister of Public Works will see that we have one or two dredges built in that province suitable for the wants. I congratulate the hon. gentleman on the influence he can exercise in this House, not only on the supporters of the government, but on hon. members opposite, and on the manner in which he looks after the requirements of the country, for whenever he finds anything important requires to be done for the improvement of trade, he is ready and willing to do it.

Topic:   SUPPLY-THE CONTRACT WITH THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT BOUNTY.
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March 1, 1901

Mr. ROSS (Victoria).

Topic:   SUPPLY-THE CORONATION OATH.
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