Angus MCLENNAN

MCLENNAN, Angus, M.D.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Inverness (Nova Scotia)
Birth Date
May 3, 1844
Deceased Date
August 27, 1908
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angus_MacLennan
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=7820934e-0c85-4718-88bf-5f5465127e36&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
physician

Parliamentary Career

June 23, 1896 - October 9, 1900
LIB
  Inverness (Nova Scotia)
November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
LIB
  Inverness (Nova Scotia)
November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Inverness (Nova Scotia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 22)


July 13, 1908

Mr. MCLENNAN.

I would like to ask the minister whether he has given any attention to the very modest request I made the other evening. I observe a duplication of the Intercolonial Railway in the county of Cape Breton, a proposed duplication in Cumberland and Pictou and Colchester and a subway in the county of Pictou in the country district. I do not object to these, but I claim that the very modest requirements of the county of Inverness should receive a little more consideration. I noticed in the city yesterday Mr. Mann one of the Inverness Railway and Coal Company, and I hoped that the minister would call his attention to the matter of the joint user of the terminals at Port Tupper. I would like to know from the minister whether he has

given attention to the advisability of either coming to an arrangement with that company or making some provision or other out of tiiis item for increased accommodation by furnishing a modest shelter in the way of a station at Hawkesbury junction on the Intercolonial Railway.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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July 7, 1908

Mr. ANGUS MCLENNAN (Inverness).

Before you leave the Nova Scotia items, I desire to call attention to the fact that while I am pleased to see so many votes for increased accommodation along various sections of the Intercolonial Railway passing through that province, I regret that the good old county of Inverness, through which thirty-five miles of the road runs, is left out. My regret is that the minister, on his tour of inspection, did not have time to see that fine county in daylight, and most of all to see its requirements. There is a private company owned railway running along the county of Inverness, a distance of 61 miles. There are three thriving coal mining towns tributary to that road, together with about two-thirds of the area of the county of Inverness and its people. All the freight emanating from these mining towns and other parts of that county, together with the passenger traffic, passes, almost all of it, over the Intercolonial Railway. That other railway forms a junction with the Intercolonial Railway about a mile and a half or so from the Strait of Canso, or about a mile and a half from Point Tupper, one of the Intercolonial railway terminals. Every passenger-and this is what I desire to call attention to particularly-who leaves the county of Inverness by that road has to land in a swamp along the track of the Intercolonial Railway. The government, it would appear, took excellent care to make accommodation for the freight coming off the Inverness and Richmond Railway, but it left the passengers to shift for themselves, and they have to land, as I have said, about a mile and a half from the government station at Point Tupper. The attention of the late Minister of Railways (Mr. Blair) was brought to this matter by myself, and he claimed that it was the duty of the private company to provide a shelter there for its passengers. The company, on the other hand, contend that they have their station in the town

of Hawkesbury, about one-quarter of a mile from this junction, and that the moment they land their passengers on the Intercolonial track they are Intercolonial passengers, and consequently they back their train right to their station in the town of Hawkesbury. I have been time and again on board the Intercolonial and taken the Inverness train to my home, and in the spring and winter I have seen twenty-five to thirty passengers, of both sexes, having to walk the whole length of the train in snow and slush to their knees and get to the Intercolonial as best they could. This has been going on some six or seven years, so that it is a case, as far as the people of Inverness are concerned, of being between the de'il and the deep sea. What I contend is that the passenger earnings which the Intercolonial derives from this traffic amply warrant a station being built at that junction by the government for their accommodation. The passenger earnings on this 61 miles of the Inverness railroad this last calendar year were $20,000, and no doubt that would be at least duplicated on the Intercolonial, because the run on that road is longer. With its freight traffic and passenger traffic that 01 miles of railway cleared $75,000 last year, as is shown by the government returns. These earnings, I say again, have been more than duplicated in the case of the Intercolonial, because the greater amount of that freight and traffic would go over the Intercolonial sometimes twice or three times the distance that it goes over the Inverness road. I listened to a question asked and answered in this House the other day as to the amount paid by the Sydney and Louisburg Company to the government for the use of the government terminals at Sydney. It is evident from that question and its answer that the Sydney and Louisburg road is compelled to make use of the government terminals at iSydney, for which they pay a certain amount. What I claim is then that it is the duty of the government either to erect a modest station for the shelter of the passengers here or compel the running of the Inverness trains into the government terminals at Point Tupper. The people of Inverness would be perfectly satisfied with either.

Topic:   SUPPLY-APPOINTMENT OF JUDGES IN QUEBEC.
Subtopic:   190S
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July 7, 1908

Mr. MCLENNAN.

There is an excellent way for the minister to arrange this matter perhaps better than in any other, and that is to make this excellent piece of railway a branch of the Intercolonial-to take it over and experiment with it as an excellent feeder of the road. I am introducing this subject to the attention of the minister with the hopeful assurance that the road cleared $75,000 in its working for the last calendar year.

Topic:   SUPPLY-APPOINTMENT OF JUDGES IN QUEBEC.
Subtopic:   190S
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July 7, 1908

Mr. MCLENNAN.

About a mile and a half. I think that the request I make of the government is perfectly reasonable. To show the absurdity of the present arrangement let me state the position as it is. A freight train to-day leaves Inverness town, goes to the junction and then right ou into the government terminals at Point Tupper, where it transfers its freight comfortably. But a train loaded with passengers leaves soon after and is treated very differently.

The passengers are dumped in a swamp, the most hideous looking place along the Intercolonial Railway.

I was determined, before these votes went through, to call the attention of the Minister of Railways to this matter, in order that at least, he should give the matter attention when the Supplementary Estimates are being prepared, or arrange with the company, as I have indicated, that they might use the government terminals at Point Tup-per. I certainly refuse to hold a seat in this House quietly and silently while this abuse of the people X represent goes on.

Topic:   SUPPLY-APPOINTMENT OF JUDGES IN QUEBEC.
Subtopic:   190S
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June 23, 1908

Mr. MCLENNAN.

The sand is arrested by this work ns it proceeds out to sea. And therefore it protects the harbour from the sand flowing in.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   LIST OF BRANDS OF CEMENT USED BY THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT DURING THE FISCAL YEAR 1907-1908.
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