Raymond Elmer ANDERSON

ANDERSON, Raymond Elmer

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Norfolk (Ontario)
Birth Date
July 7, 1891
Deceased Date
August 6, 1970
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raymond_Elmer_Anderson
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=87a87680-819b-4f9e-8429-509c21841413&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer

Parliamentary Career

June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  Norfolk (Ontario)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Norfolk (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 7)


May 3, 1956

Mr. Anderson:

I am speaking mainly for

the people of the county of Norfolk and the counties surrounding Norfolk.

In the area between Simcoe and Port Dover there was produced in 1954 a total of

450,000 crates of sweet corn. Some of that was exported after being precooled. More of this crop could be grown.

Something else that is new in Norfolk is irrigation. The tobacco men have miles and miles of irrigation pipe. They use the creeks as a water supply and also any low-lying areas which fill up in the winter with water which can be used when needed. This provides a problem because we are not too sure yet as to what we are doing. Sometimes too much irrigation will ruin a crop and it must be applied at the right time. There is an old saying that every farmer has a stiff neck because he is always watching the sun and the clouds. Weather determines what we are going to do from day to day.

We need new varieties, especially in strawberries. Twenty years ago we had a variety called the Parson Beauty that produced quite well for years. Lately the Premier variety has predominated but we are always looking for a new variety which will produce well and remain firm in shipping.

There is an experimental tobacco station at Delhi, but the soil there is not representative of the county. It will grow tobacco but not all kinds of fruits and vegetables. Perhaps the minister could see his way clear to allowing the office there to be used so that any directions could go out from that point. I would respectfully request that the minister give careful consideration to this matter in the light of the support that has been forthcoming from every part of the farm population of Norfolk and in view of our increasing need.

I should like also to support the hon. member for Wellington South in his request that the premium on grade A hogs be increased

and that the premium on grade B hogs remain the same. This would tend to add quality to our bacon and assist in our exports.

Topic:   AIR TRANSPORT
Subtopic:   STATEMENT AS TO PRIVATE PLANE
Full View Permalink

May 3, 1956

Mr. Anderson:

Mr. Chairman, the house will recall that on July 22 last year I spoke on the estimates for agriculture and made a request for a dominion experimental station in Norfolk. I do not intend to make the same speech all over again but there are a few points I would like to re-emphasize.

First of all, farm income has not risen with other lines of endeavour and in some cases it has declined. This would be bad

Supply-Agriculture

in any event, but to make matters worse our operating costs have risen sharply and farmers are now in a squeeze that could be disastrous if nothing is done about it.

One way for government assistance to work to the advantage of our farmers would be for us to have this experimental farm located in Norfolk so that farmers could, under direction, work out some of our problems. I think perhaps our needs are greater now than they were in 1955 and I am renewing the request for this station.

Our temperature in Norfolk is about five degrees lower than at Harrow and Vineland, the other two government stations, and varieties that do well there would not give us the same production under our different growing conditions and temperatures.

My request of last year has won universal support in Norfolk and it has particularly won the support of the county council which sent four of its members here on April 24 to support the request for a station.

Bruce Wallace, who is a large apple and cherry grower and manager of Norfolk Fruit Growers and Norfolk Berry Growers, met the minister with us. We were favourably received by the Minister of Agriculture, the Minister of Finance and the deputy minister of agriculture.

The press in Norfolk has also supported the request both editorially and in news items. The London Free Press and the Brantford Expositor have also given the request much support.

I think perhaps the committee will bear with me if I quote some of the production figures I gave last year. I regret that these figures are for the year 1954 and perhaps are not quite relevant to the year which has passed.

First of all, we had 2,000 acres of apples in Norfolk and 400,000 bushels were produced in 1954. Last year we had relatively the same acreage but we produced many more apples and experienced some difficulty in selling them. There were 30 acres of sweet cherries and we produced 640 bushels. There were 142 acres of sour cherries and we produced 16,730 bushels. That was in 1954, Mr. Chairman. In 1955 sour cherries were about double and again we experienced some trouble in disposing of them.

There were 500 acres of peaches which produced over 60,000 bushels. There were 66 acres of Bartlett pears which produced

20,000 bushels. There were 103 acres of Keifer pears which produced 16,000 bushels. Now I would like to deal with strawberries.

Topic:   AIR TRANSPORT
Subtopic:   STATEMENT AS TO PRIVATE PLANE
Full View Permalink

May 3, 1956

Mr. Anderson:

I am speaking mainly for

the people of the county of Norfolk and the counties surrounding Norfolk.

In the area between Simcoe and Port Dover there was produced in 1954 a total of 450,000 crates of sweet corn. Some of that was exported after being precooled. More of this crop could be grown.

Something else that is new in Norfolk is irrigation. The tobacco men have miles and miles of irrigation pipe. They use the creeks as a water supply and also any low-lying areas which fill up in the winter with water which can be used when needed. This provides a problem because we are not too sure yet as to what we are doing. Sometimes too much irrigation will ruin a crop and it must be applied at the right time. There is an old saying that every farmer has a stiff neck because he is always watching the sun and the clouds. Weather determines what we are going to do from day to day.

We need new varieties, especially in strawberries. Twenty years ago we had a variety called the Parson Beauty that produced quite well for years. Lately the Premier variety has predominated but we are always looking for a new variety which will produce well and remain firm in shipping.

There is an experimental tobacco station at Delhi, but the soil there is not representative of the county. It will grow tobacco but not all kinds of fruits and vegetables. Perhaps the minister could see his way clear to allowing the office there to be used so that any directions could go out from that point. I would respectfully request that the minister give careful consideration to this matter in the light of the support that has been forthcoming from every part of the farm population of Norfolk and in view of our increasing need.

I should like also to support the hon. member for Wellington South in his request that the premium on grade A hogs be increased

and that the premium on grade B hogs remain the same. This would tend to add quality to our bacon and assist in our exports.

Topic:   AIR TRANSPORT
Subtopic:   STATEMENT AS TO PRIVATE PLANE
Full View Permalink

May 3, 1956

Mr. Anderson:

Mr. Chairman, the house will recall that on July 22 last year I spoke on the estimates for agriculture and made a request for a dominion experimental station in Norfolk. I do not intend to make the same speech all over again but there are a few points I would like to re-emphasize.

First of all, farm income has not risen with other lines of endeavour and in some cases it has declined. This would be bad

Supply-Agriculture

in any event, but to make matters worse our operating costs have risen sharply and farmers are now in a squeeze that could be disastrous if nothing is done about it.

One way for government assistance to work to the advantage of our farmers would be for us to have this experimental farm located in Norfolk so that farmers could, under direction, work out some of our problems. I think perhaps our needs are greater now than they were in 1955 and I am renewing the request for this station.

Our temperature in Norfolk is about five degrees lower than at Harrow and Vineland, the other two government stations, and varieties that do well there would not give us the same production under our different growing conditions and temperatures.

My request of last year has won universal support in Norfolk and it has particularly won the support of the county council which sent four of its members here on April 24 to support the request for a station.

Bruce Wallace, who is a large apple and cherry grower and manager of Norfolk Fruit Growers and Norfolk Berry Growers, met the minister with us. We were favourably received by the Minister of Agriculture, the Minister of Finance and the deputy minister of agriculture.

The press in Norfolk has also supported the request both editorially and in news items. The London Free Press and the Brantford Expositor have also given the request much support.

I think perhaps the committee will bear with me if I quote some of the production figures I gave last year. I regret that these figures are for the year 1954 and perhaps are not quite relevant to the year which has passed.

First of all, we had 2,000 acres of apples in Norfolk and 400,000 bushels were produced in 1954. Last year we had relatively the same acreage but we produced many more apples and experienced some difficulty in selling them. There were 30 acres of sweet cherries and we produced 640 bushels. There were 142 acres of sour cherries and we produced 16,730 bushels. That was in 1954, Mr. Chairman. In 1955 sour cherries were about double and again we experienced some trouble in disposing of them.

There were 500 acres of peaches which produced over 60,000 bushels. There were 66 acres of Bartlett pears which produced 20,000 bushels. There were 103 acres of Keifer pears which produced 16,000 bushels. Now I would like to deal with strawberries.

Topic:   AIR TRANSPORT
Subtopic:   STATEMENT AS TO PRIVATE PLANE
Full View Permalink

May 3, 1956

Mr. Anderson:

We had 1,100 acres of strawberries in 1954 which produced 3,300,000 quarts and in 1955 this production was well over 4 millions quarts. Our production has increased a little in the two years. We expect we will have a very heavy crop in 1956 because they weathered the winter well.

I wish now to deal with fresh market vegetables. We had a production of 15,000 bushels of tomatoes and 175,000 bushels of potatoes in 1954 and last year it was about the same.

Topic:   AIR TRANSPORT
Subtopic:   STATEMENT AS TO PRIVATE PLANE
Full View Permalink