Herbert Macdonald MOWAT

MOWAT, Herbert Macdonald, K.C., LLB.

Parliamentary Career

December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
UNION
  Parkdale (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 2 of 31)


May 31, 1921

Mr. MOWAT:

It may refer to the Rivers and Streams Act of Ontario. In the case of the Keewatin Power Company vs. Town of Kenora, Mr. Justice Anglin held:

I have little hesitation in holding that the Winnipeg river, said to carry a volume of wate" little inferior to that of the Ottawa, formerly a great channel of commerce, must be deemed a navigable river.

Topic:   REVISED EDITION. COMMONS
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May 27, 1921

Mr. MOWAT:

While the minister is

looking up this information I might say a word in regard to the acoustics of this Chamber. I went into the Railway Committee room a couple of days ago with Mr. Pearson, the architect, and we tested the acoustics there. We both spoke in raised voices, and he said that the reason why the hearing was so bad there was that the room was not yet fully furnished. The room must have a mat be said, and he added that there was no doubt at all that hearing would improve when the room was properly furnished. He also thinks that this chamber possesses as good acoustic properties as any he has ever known, and he quotes Mr. Lowther, the Speaker of the British House, who spoke here the other day, as saying that in his opinion he had never spoken in a building or in a room which had better acoustic properties than this chamber. The hon. member for Antigonish and Guysborough (Mr. Sinclair) who raised this question almost disproved his own point, for every word he said was perfectly audible over here as far off as I am. The point I wish to make is this: hon. gentlemen have not apparently the mental attitude, when speaking, that is necessary if they wish to be heard. They get up, and instead of speaking, converse across the floor with somebody else and only a few members can hear them. If hon. gentlemen, every time they got .up, would make a speech instead of indulging in what is nothing but a private conversation, there would be no difficulty about hearing them and there Would be no complaint about the chamber. I think that this is a splendidly proportioned chamber, possessing first-rate acoustic properties, and if hon. gentlemen would always observe the rule

which has been laid down by the architect, never to address any one in particular but to look at the clock and speak at the clock, they would make themselves heard and there would be no trouble about the hearing in the chamber.

Topic:   REVISED EDITION. COMMONS
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May 26, 1921

Mr. MOWAT:

Kennel keeping is an important industry in which a large amount of money is invested. By this section we have made it an offence to dock or injure the tails of dogs, which would mean that a kennel which had imported a $5,000 pedigreed dog would be prevented from docking the tails of that dog's progeny. No self-respecting dog of a certain class wishes to have his tail long; he wants to have it cut. An airedale or fox terrier with a long tail would be absolutely out of the prize list in the New York dog show. Therefore I think the minister should reconsider this section; otherwise he will have deputations from every kennel in the country asking why he is putting such a law in force. There is no cruelty in docking a dog's tail. Anybody who has kept dogs knows that it is done two or three weeks after the puppy is born. The puppy may give a little squeal, but the next minute he is licking your hand. I think it would be a great ipity to spoil our pedigree dogs by enacting that their tails should not be docked.

Topic:   REVISED EDITION. COMMONS
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May 26, 1921

Mr. MOWAT:

It seems to me we made a slip this afternoon in regard to section 19. We have made it an offence to dock or injure-

Topic:   REVISED EDITION. COMMONS
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May 6, 1921

Mr. MOWAT:

Does it not mean the

plural of "seal?"

Topic:   PRISONS AND REFORMATORIES
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