Hiram Augustus CALVIN

CALVIN, Hiram Augustus

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Frontenac (Ontario)
Birth Date
April 6, 1851
Deceased Date
January 13, 1932
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiram_Augustus_Calvin
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=8cb2715c-4a36-4d4f-9128-72773deefefb&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
businessman

Parliamentary Career

June 10, 1892 - April 24, 1896
IND
  Frontenac (Ontario)
November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
CON
  Frontenac (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 4)


March 8, 1901

Mr. CALVIN.

I had not intended to say anything at all in this matter, but as the hon. minister has invited an expression of opinion by members on both sides, I shall say a few words. While I do not wish to find fault with the spending of money in deepening Port Colborne harbour-for I think it is necessary that the harbour should be iu such a shape as to be lit to receive large vessels with a deep draught-yet, I do think that what money is spent on Port Colborne harbour should be spent with a view to having, later on, a Welland canal large enough to receive the largest class of vessels. The navigation of the great lakes is a different style of navigation from that of the River St. Lawrence. The River St. Lawrence from Kingston, or, if you prefer it, from Prescott, down, is practically a canal, that is, it is a canal with stretches of river which are the same as canals in not calling for such a staunch style of vessels as are necessary on the lakes. Practically the great lakes are small seas, and the style of craft necessary there is one that would be practically safe upon the ocean itself. From Duluth, or from Chicago, to the beginning of the St. Lawrence proper, that is, to the foot of Lake Ontario, is a chain of lake navigation. That is broken at the Welland canal now. The hon. minister should not lay out his work with the intention of having what we may call the small Welland canal-that is, a canal of a size which will accommodate the present modern size of boat. I desire to draw the hon. minister's attention to the fact that from Port Colborne to Kingston and from Port Dalhousie to Kingston, the navigation calls for the same style of vessel, so far as seaworthiness and style of navigation are concerned, so far as the class of officer and seamen are concerned, as is required on the upper lakes. Therefore, it is not wise for the hon. minister to proceed as though the Welland canal were to be made part of a chain of river navigation, because after the Welland canal is passed and Lake Ontario is entered, there is a stretch of lake navigation before the river navigation begins. As I sny, tbe navigation of the river does not call for so staunch a style of vessel or so expensive a crew. Take, for instance, the present style of craft now navigating the St. Lawrence-with a capacity of 25,000 or 30,000 bushels and costing $8,000 or $9,000 when new, pin flats, as they are called, which carry most cheaply. Of course, if you can carry your grain iu a craft that does not cost more than thirty or forty cents a bushel to build, you have an advantage over a style of vessel that costs twice as much, such vessels as are necessary for the navigation of the lakes. The point I seek to make is that there are Mr. TARTE.

two great chains of navigation, the lake chain to the foot of Lake Ontario, and then the river chain from the foot of Lake Ontario to Montreal. The object of tbe government should he to make each chain complete. As the hon. minister has asked for suggestions, I would suggest also that the tolls might be taken off the Welland canal.

Topic:   SUPPLY-THE CONTRACT WITH THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT BOUNTY.
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March 8, 1901

Mr. CALVIN.

They amounted last year to something over $100,00O, which Is a small amount of money compared with the interest on the expenditure represented in the canal. These tolls are a direct hindrance to trade. Take the tolls on coal, for example. The toll-rate on coal on the Welland canal is twenty cents a ton. Why, coal has been carried from Buffalo to Chicago or Buffalo to Duluth, for 25 cents a ton ; so you can see what a barrier this toll of 10 cents a ton must be, and bow it will restrict the carrying of merchandise through our canal system. The result has been that tbe carriage of coal through the Welland canal has been cut down to about half to what it was two or three years ago. So far as canals are concerned, we meet the Americans at two points, once at the Soo, where both our canal and the American canal are free, and again at Port Colborne, where we have a canal with tolls, while the Americans have a canal on which no tolls are charged. Our trade is handicapped to that extent.

Topic:   SUPPLY-THE CONTRACT WITH THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY.
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT BOUNTY.
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March 8, 1901

Mr. CALVIN.

Does the hon. gentleman (Mr. Britton) say that that includes the transferring charges at Kingston.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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March 8, 1901

Mr. CALVIN.

Does it include any of the elevating charges at Montreal ?

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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