David Wesley BOLE

BOLE, David Wesley

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Winnipeg (Manitoba)
Birth Date
February 15, 1856
Deceased Date
June 24, 1933
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Wesley_Bole
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=a3fe6ef9-fe78-444c-b7cc-4961c326529d&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
newspaper editor, pharmacist

Parliamentary Career

November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Winnipeg (Manitoba)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 6 of 7)


April 18, 1905

Mr. BOLE.

Clause SI provides for the compulsory education of the children of Catholic parents. Clause 90 provides that if the Lieutenant Governor in Council refuse to sanction a loan the Governor General may do so. Clause 110 provides for the establishment of a normal school in the town of St. Boniface. This Remedial Bill does not even give the legislature of Manitoba the option of locating a normal school. Now, Mr. Speaker, that was the issue.

Topic:   PROVINCIAL AUTONOMY IN THE NORTHWEST.
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April 18, 1905

Mr. BOLE.

479$

both inside and outside this House, expressing diametrically opposite views. But it is just this conflict of opinion amongst the lawyers which makes the situation so uncertain and which might cause the adoption of the amendment of the leader of the opposition to be the very worst blow that could be struck at the national school idea in the new provinces. If I understand Mr. Haultain and those who hold his views, the word ' union ' in clause 93 and the other clauses of the British North America Act of 1867 applies to the Territories when taken over by the Canadian government in 1870. If that opinion be good law, then the national school idea or any other idea which the legislatures of the new provinces might feel it their duty to enact would have full sway, because in 1870 there were no separate schools in the Territories to claim the protection of the British North America Act. But on the other hand, if the opinion expressed by other eminent lawyers, including my hon. friend from Jacques Cartier (Mr. Monk), be good law and the word ' union ' applies to the provinces the day they are constituted as such, and if nevertheless the legislatures of the new provinces should refuse to establish separate schools, it is fair to assume that the courts, when appealed to by the minority, would compel them to do so. More than that the courts would be asked to decide the kind of separate schools-the minority are entitled to-whether the kind provided by the ordinance of the Northwest Territories in 1892; or the kind anticipated by the Northwest Territories Act of 1875, which were in vogue between 1884 and 1892. If the courts should decide in favour of the latter, the people of the Territories would for ever be tied to a system of separate schools of the extreme type, purely denominational, with every vestige of the national idea lost for ever. Are advocates of the national schools prepared to take that risk, for that is the risk they take by supporting the amendment of the leader of the opposition.

What is the difference between these two kinds of schools-the school they had in the Territories between 1884 and 1892 and the schools are there at present? All the members of this House have had before them the text of the Northwest Territories ordinance of 1S92, so that it is not necessary to explain in detail the school system now existing in the Territories. I may briefly say that the schools now in vogue are national in the full meaning of the word. A responsible minister is at their head, they are administered by a national council, they are inspected by a national inspector, they are taught by teachers qualified under national and common conditions, and use text books in common authorized by the national council. What else ? If a minority either Protestant or Catholic, are sufficiently strong to support a school out of their own taxes they may do so. For what purpose? In order that Mr. BOLE.

they may for half an hour each day teach religious subjects according to the faith that is within them. The schools then that are in the Territories to-day are national to the fullest extent of the meaning of that word. Is that a bad system ? Are we to be told by a Christian nation that that system is good except in this respect, that a half hour is given in the separate schools for religious exercise after the school hours are closed ?-I refuse to believe that this country will pronounce that system a good one save for this single exception. Are we to be told by a Christian nation that a system is good except that clause which provides for a half hour religious teaching each day ? I refuse to believe that neighbour will rise against neighbour and go to war over such a provision as this, and yet it is about this that all the agitation is aroused. You may talk about provincial rights until the end of the chapter, but provincial rights has only a remote and distorted connection with this agitation that is existing in the province of Ontario to-day. Mr. Speaker, I am here to-say that if it is a proper thing to have the name of God mentioned in our schools, if it is proper to supplement the religious teachings of the home and church with a Christian atmosphere in the school-room- and such a thing is declared proper by the leaders of all the churches-then the only practical way is to separate the children for this purpose. My hon. friend from Montreal (Mr. Ames) quoted the other day the opinion of the late Dr. King, principal of the Manitoba college in favour of -teaching religion in the schools. He might also have quoted his successor Dr. Patrick, who is a strong advocate of religious exercises in our public schools. He might also have quoted the late Archbishop Macrae, primate of all Canada, who expressed very strong views on the same subject, and the leaders of the Methodist church in Manitoba. If then, it is right and proper to have the name of God mentioned and honoured in our public schools and a short time devoted to religious teaching, the only practical way in which you can do that is to separate the children. It is beyond the wisdom of mortals, it is impossible for human ingenuity to devise a common religious ground upon which all can stand. But we are told that if the children are separated in school, they will be separated as citizens in manhood and womanhood. There is no doubt some little truth in that statement; but if we carry this idea to a logical conclusion, we must close all our denominational colleges and seminaries. Are there half a dozen hon. members in this House who are not supporting voluntary separate schools ? I am at this-moment, so are others on the other side of the House-not alone for theological purposes but for purposes of secular education. We hear a good deal about the boys of separate schools meeting the boys of public schools after hours and arguing the subject

Topic:   PROVINCIAL AUTONOMY IN THE NORTHWEST.
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March 20, 1905

Mr. BOLE.

I appreciate the point made by the hon. gentleman (Mr. Foster), but I think that as this is the first annuity company, they are entitled to the advantage that comes from being first in the field. I might remark also that the name that has been put in the Bill was the second choice made at a full meeting of the promoters. Also a leading promoter consulted with the officers of the department on Saturday and there appeared to them to be no objection ; in fact, they regarded it as a very happy and proper name to give the company. I think, that, under these circumstances, the Bill should be allowed to go through.

Topic:   DOMINION ANNUITY COMPANY.
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March 6, 1905

Mr. BOLE.

The point I desire to raise is whether it is advisable we should endorse the principle of incorporating more telephones. A Bill somewhat similar to this was introduced in the Manitoba Legislature a few weeks ago and was opposed by the council of the city of Winnipeg, which I have the honour to represent in this House. They opposed it chiefly on the ground that as the policy of taking over the business of telephone companies by the government was in the air, it would not be advisable to incorporate any more companies, and the Bill was sent back to the committee in order that Mr. WHITE.

they might carefully inquire into the whole question of having telephone business conducted by the government. When the Bill before us was introduced into this House, I regret very much that I was not present and therefore unable to put on record my objection ; and I deem it now my duty to reflect the opinion expressed by the city of Winnipeg, an opinion with which I am in full sympathy and accord. I have in my hands a resolution passed by the city council of Winnipeg on February 20, last, which is as follows :

That as this council have a reasonable hope that the telephone system may in the near future he under government control, they would look with disfavour on the granting of any new telephone charters as complicating the situation, and hereby instruct our solicitors to oppose any such legislation now contemplated at Ottawa.

With the spirit of that resolution I am fully in harmony. A telephone businessf being essentially a monopoly and an important public utility, it is dangerous to have it in the hands of a private corporation. A great many cities throughout the United States, and I think in Canada also, have made thorough inquiries into this subject. The city of San Francisco had an application before it for a charter for a local exchange, but representations were made to the council that the telephone business was essentially a monopoly, and therefore no new telephone company should be chartered and the application was not granted. Instead, the city of San Francisco appointed a commission to inquire into the whole subject, and the commission reported. This is the last clause of its report, as published in the bulletin of the League of American Municipalities in November, 1904 :

Inasmuch as a telephone was essentially a monopoly, that it would simply increase the burden on the -citizens when they increased the number of telephone companies. There is no other public utility with which we come in contact where there are so many objections to competition.

That is the mandate of a commission which has made extensive inquiries, which visited all the important cities on the Pacific coast and examined into the conditions.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS.
Subtopic:   NORTHWEST TELEPHONE COMPANY.
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March 6, 1905

Mr. BOLE.

A commission was appointed by the city of San Francisco to inquire into the whole question of the telephone business. An application was made by certain promoters to the city of San Francisco for permission to construct and operate a rival telephone business in San Francisco. Representations were made to the city council that to multiply telephone lines would be a nuisance, and the city council therefore

appointed a commission to inquire into tlie whole question and they have reported as I stated that the rival telephone company is a nuisance and recommend that the request of the promoters should not be granted.

Now with respect to rates, it is very true that nearly all independent companies start out with low rates; that is the experience throughout Canada and the United States, but the same authority that I have just quoted states that the editor has made extensive inquiries into the whole subject, and I shall read his observation with respect to the question of rates. He said -

During the past' decade hundreds of independent telephone companies have been started in all parts of the country and although their rates are much lower than those charged by the Bell companies the competition does not usually result in any saving to the telephone users generally. The Bell companies have almost invariably refused to meet the cut rates of their new competitors for the very good reason, perhaps, that while they may temporarily suffer a falling oft in patronage, they soon recover and finally increase the number of their subscribers in the face of the competition. In the various cities of all sizes and conditions, where we have investigated the subject of telephone competition, we find the Bell companies have been able to maintain their rates, and at the same time greatly increase the number of their subscribers. This fact must be taken as evidence that the Bell service is considered by telephone users to be worth the price asked for it. The fact is that in every city where there are two telephone companies in operation the business and professional men find it necessary to have the service of both companies, and where the Bell rates are not reduced by the competition these users have forced upon them an additional expense for telephone service.

It will be seen from this that while the rates are invariably lower when they start because of their short connections and because the new company is first connected with business houses, still it appears to be the result of the subsequent extension of their lines that the cost of operation is increased proportionately beyond their income. Nearly all companies, as nearly as I can learn have got into difficulties ; there are some companies that have succeeded in Canada and some in the United States, hut I find that the almost invariable rule is that competing companies have failed and gone into insolvency. I might also quote another extract from the same authority. They say :

In practically every city where we have investigated the financial history and status of independent telephone companies, we find the receipts have been inadequate to cover the charges against the business, and this general condition may safely be attributed to the low rates at which the Independent companies undertake to furnish service.

I am not here as the special advocate of the Bell Telephone Company. On the con-I

trary I believe that the Bell Telephone Company have by nature a monopoly and I believe that a monopoly of an important public utility should not he in the hands of any private corporation, and I think therefore that we could verj properly consider at this time the policy of having the telephone business conducted by the government. As time goes on these applications for telephone charters will increase in number and as they increase they will become a nuisance to telephone users. It is well known to every person who has lived in a city where there is a duplicate telephone service that business men are obliged to put in two sets, and the result is that while the introduction of a new company may reduce the rates, at the same time at the end of the year it is found that the citizens are paying more for telephone rates than before. I therefore feel it is my duty to move that the committee rise, report progress and ask leave to sit again.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS.
Subtopic:   NORTHWEST TELEPHONE COMPANY.
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