Charles Gavan POWER

POWER, The Hon. Charles Gavan, P.C., B.A., LL.L.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Quebec South (Quebec)
Birth Date
January 18, 1888
Deceased Date
May 30, 1968
Website
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Gavan_Power
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=a47e2fa3-277a-47c3-8868-2fc0fdddd05a&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
L LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)
December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)
  • Minister of Pensions and National Health (October 23, 1935 - September 18, 1939)
  • Postmaster General (September 19, 1939 - May 22, 1940)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)
  • Postmaster General (September 19, 1939 - May 22, 1940)
  • Minister of National Defence for Air and Associate Minister of National Defence (May 23, 1940 - November 26, 1944)
  • Minister of National Defence for Air (May 23, 1940 - November 26, 1944)
  • Minister of National Defence (June 11, 1940 - July 4, 1940)
  • Associate Minister of National Defence (July 12, 1940 - November 26, 1944)
June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Quebec South (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1528 of 1532)


March 27, 1919

Mr. POWER:

Mr. Speaker-

Topic:   26, 19X9
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March 27, 1919

Mr. CHARLES GAVAN POWER (Quebec South):

After having listened for a considerable time to the various opinions expressed, I have come to the conclusion, somewhat reluctantly, I admit, that the inconvenience occasioned to the farmer by the passage of this law will not be greater than the disadvantages which will result to the city worker and dweller should the law not be re-enacted. In common with a great many members of this House I have the greatest possible sympathy with the farming community, so much so that the day before yesterday I voted to remove what I thought was a very substantial grievance under which they were suffering. Unfortunately, Mr. Speaker, a large number of the members of the House who belong to the farming class did not seem to want that grievance removed. Now, Sir, taking those circumstances for granted, I must look to my own constituency, and I find, from letters, telegrams, and communications of all sorts which I have received in the past few days, that the financial, the business, and the working classes of the city of Quebec are almost unanimous in favour of a measure of daylight saving. That being my own conviction as *well as the conviction of my constituency, I will take great pleasure in supporting the resolution introduced by the member for Vancouver South (Mr. Cooper).

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   DAYLIGHT SAVING.
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March 27, 1919

Mr. C. G. POWER (Quebec South):

Mr. Speaker, I beg to move the adjournment of the debate.

Motion negatived.

Topic:   26, 19X9
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April 5, 1918

Mr. POWER:

thirty or forty thousand, but appeals on the part of individuals were very few. These appeals began to be heard some time in January. The judges heard witnesses, allowed the conscript to state his case, and to be represented by counsel, and the case was heard like an ordinary civil case. Everything went welh Later on, the Government or the Minister of Justice, or someone else in authority-because after my experience with Colonel Machin I do not know just where to place the responsibility -decided that perhaps the law was being too well observed in Quebec, that they reported well, and that their exemptions were being pleaded well. But the rumbling of the storm which broke out this evening, was being heard in the other provinces, and it was suddenly decided to clean up in six weeks the cases which in the ordinary course of events would have taken six months to decide. Hundreds of people were summoned to the courts; relatives and children came to hear these exemption cases. There is nothing discussed except exemption and exemption and exemption. So long as the cases were carefully listened to, nothing was done; but from the moment that a judge was brought from Three Rivers, conditions changed. As a member of the Bar, I have the utmost respect for the Bench, but a certain judge was brought from Three Rivers, and with all the brutality which characterized Judge Jeffries in the worst time of English history, he refused to listen to draftees, treating them rudely, would not allow attorneys to'state their clients' cases, insulted any one who appeared in court

Topic:   ADOLPHE STEIN.
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April 5, 1918

Mr. POWER:

The rumour was that certain of these detectives had torn up papers belonging to exempted men.

Topic:   ADOLPHE STEIN.
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