Leon Johnson LADNER

LADNER, Leon Johnson, K.C., B.A., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Vancouver South (British Columbia)
Birth Date
November 29, 1885
Deceased Date
April 12, 1978
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leon_Johnson_Ladner
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=a5878456-2673-465c-9534-72a6e7428cb7&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
CON
  Vancouver South (British Columbia)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
CON
  Vancouver South (British Columbia)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
CON
  Vancouver South (British Columbia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 335 of 336)


April 5, 1922

Mr. L. J. LADNER (Vancouver South):

I do not see why hon. members from Nova Scotia should feel that they alone are concerned about our coast ports; at any rate, British Columbians always like to have their say when it comes to a discussion of such matters. One interesting feature has been disclosed in this debate. It is not so much a question in my opinion, Mr. Speaker, whether the motion before the House has any merit one way or the other, but this debate, like many others, has disclosed the fact that there are twro lines of thought permeating our public men, evidenced more strongly in our Progressive friends than in any other political body. It will be found in the debates- and I do not say it by way of disparagement-that our Progressive friends base public policy essentially upon economics. As between the two great parties it will be found that the outlook in formulating public policy for parliamentary action is not confined to the economic, but takes in the political and national aspect. My hon. friend from Marquette (Mr. Crerar) perhaps does not agree with me in this, but I leave it to hon. members generally to confirm my statement that in this discussion, as in many other discussions, his party is mainly influenced by the considera-

tion that a policy is to be measured by its consequences in dollars and cents rather than in its consequences on our nationhood and our national outlook.

I submit, Mr. Speaker, that if the war has taught us one thing-and we can learn much from the war-it has taught us that all these picayune economic advantages which may be gained in a temporary fashion, by legislation or otherwise, fade to nothing when the conflict of arms takes place as it did in the great war; As a result of such conflict one great principle is established, one on which the members of this House are solid-and we have the history of our country to back us-and that is the principle of the necessity of developing an outlook for our nationhood and the maintenance of our national entity, and this you cannot do if you compromise our most vital economic interest by associating with another country from which you cannot be extricated in times of economic difficulties. I see my hon. friend smiling; perhaps he wishes to put a question to me.

Topic:   BRITISH PREFERENCE AND CANADIAN SEAPORTS
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April 5, 1922

Mr. LADNER:

I did not make the suggestion that my hon. friends were lacking in patriotism. In no part of Canada did the people exhibit a greater sense of responsibility or a more loyal sentiment during the war than the -people of the prairie provinces. But what I say is -that in connection with matters which have been discussed in this House the economic aspect has been to-o -much emphasized; the question is always asked, what is to be the result in dollars and cents? My point is that we must take a broader view of these matters; we must evidence a spirit of cooperation throughout all parts of the country. It may be necessary for one portion of Canada to give way in some degree as respects their individual interests, for the benefit of the whole country-as has been so well expressed by the hon. member for St. John City (Mr. Baxter) in connection with Nova Scotia. The purpose of this resolution is a very fair one: it is national in its outlook; it has the national welfare in view. The Liberal-Conservative party has always taken the attitude that in developing our nationhood we should not stress too much the economic aspect; we should, in questions of either

Preference-Seaports

national or international import, consider the political as well as the economic point of view. We must maintain ourselves as a national entity, as other countries are doing, and as was found necessary on the part of the most highly developed form of nationhood during the war. Without that, we might have been submerged; without that, other countries might have been submerged. With that other countries have lived; with that, Canada will live-if we do not think too much of the economic aspect of these questions.

Topic:   BRITISH PREFERENCE AND CANADIAN SEAPORTS
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April 3, 1922

Mr. LADNER:

Undoubtedly the minister has given some consideration to the matter. It is a very important one for the people, both consumers and producers. Do I understand you to say it is the policy of the Government not to allow importation when the act expires.

Topic:   SUPPLY-AGRICULTURE
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April 3, 1922

Mr. LADNER:

Does the federal government draw any revenue from the fisheries as a result of this arrangement with the province of Quebec?

Topic:   QUEBEC SALMON NET LICENSES
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April 3, 1922

Mr. LADNER:

What new positions are contemplated in this vote of $4,000?

Topic:   SUPPLY-AGRICULTURE
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