Andrew BRODER

BRODER, The Hon. Andrew, P.C.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Dundas (Ontario)
Birth Date
April 16, 1845
Deceased Date
January 4, 1918
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Broder
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=a9a07775-2146-42b3-aa62-6541588c9dd9&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer, merchant

Parliamentary Career

June 23, 1896 - October 9, 1900
CON
  Dundas (Ontario)
November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
CON
  Dundas (Ontario)
November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
CON
  Dundas (Ontario)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
CON
  Dundas (Ontario)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
CON
  Dundas (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 73 of 74)


March 28, 1901

Mr. BRODER.

It is very significant that two ministers of the Crown should be in the neighbourhood of North Bruce. The hon. member (Hon. Mr. Ross) told us that Providence has been kind to the Liberals, but Providence did not favour these two ministers because the storm stayed them and snowed them in. Providence is beginning to leave you fellows over there. There is a good deal said by gentlemen opposite about the race cry, but I state here fearlessly that they are in power today because of the race cry. The race cry is not the product of a few months nor of a few years even, but you can go back to 1885 and 1886 and you find the right hon. the Prime Minister on the Champ de Mars in Montreal backed up by the Hon. Mr. Mercier trying to unite his people in one phalanx irrespective of party. There is 'the crop across the House to-day : fifty-eight members from the province of Quebec in a solid phalanx supporting the government, and seven Conservatives. Talk about the race cry. Can you find a single instance in the history of the country parallel to that. They have now the crop from ithe seed they have sown, and the moment you speak of the fine crop that they have grown on this soil that they have cultivated so long, they answer back : Oh, you are raising the race cry. I say that there is no honest man who should stand up and endeavor to make capital out of a race cry in this country. I have never done it. and I have stood up for the minority when my political interests would have been better served by taking the other side. That is known all over this country. I say that the men from the leader down who have attempted to unite the people because of their race and religion irrespective of

party, have not worked in the interest of Canada. Is not this a significant thing V I have here a quotation from speeches of the First Minister and the Hon. Mr. Mercier on the Champ de Mars as published on the 26th November, 1885, in La Patrie, and that speech of the Prime Minister is not to be found in the volume of speeches which the friend of the right hon. gentleman has published to be read by the people of Canada. Was that speech intended for Quebec ? It was not intended for the rest of the world, because it is not published. That is rather significant. It Is time hon. gentlemen opposite should cease harping on the race question. Why, you can scarcely mention the name of the Prime Minister or of the Hon. Mr. Tarte without being accused of raising the race cry. Have we not the right to deal with the conduct of public men no matter who they are or what they are ? The Conservative party is the party that has stood up for the rights of minorities in every respect. If you want authority for the statement that the Liberals have raised the race cry, you can read your own newspaper. You can turn back to the Montreal Herald of the 28th March, 1885, and you will find that it refers to the present Prime Minister and to the Hon. Edward Blake as endeavouring to make capital out of the condition of things in the North-west, and it speaks of the Globe newspaper as having for two years attempted to bring about disturbances in the North-west. I can quote from the documents of the Liberal party to prove that they are the party who live on racial cries. But, Sir, I say with pride that while the Conservative party stands here with a small phalnax from the province of Quebec, they stand as representing the best element in that province; the best element among the French Canadian people of the province of Quebec. Sir, the best element of the people, English and French, in the province of Quebec, stand behind the Conservative party in this parliament, and to-day we hear the rumblings of discontent of certain men who want to follow the lines laid down in 1885 and 1887. They stand up 'here and they say : Whist, whist, we have got all the advantage in Quebec that we can get out of that condition of things, and now we want to talk to Ontario a while. I do not believe that any honest public man should make use of such a weapon in political warfare. These gentlemen opposite cannot hurl taunts across the floor of the House without expecting a retort, and if they get a retort they have brought it upon themselves. I say, Sir, that the people of Canada irrespective of race or creed are willing to stand side by side in the great national interests of this country, and they should be allowed to do so without interference from the Liberal party.

Our old friend (Hon. Mr. Ross) spoke about the iron bounties. I think he was hardly fair in his argument, because at the present time we are paying more for iron bounties than was ever paid before in this country, and that is a condition of things he is willing to support. He told us it was time enough to bid good morning to the devil when you met him, but the hon. gentleman was between the devil and the deep sea, and he did not wish to answer that question. He has been too long in public life not to know what that question meant. He himself tells us he has been fifteen years in public life and he knows very well that was a fair question put in a fair way, and he should answer it.

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March 28, 1901

Mr. BRODER.

He had to send to Joseph, Who was in Egypt.

Hon. Mr. ROSS (Victoria, B.C.) I know the whole history.

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March 28, 1901

Mr. ANDREW BRODER (Dundas).

At this late hour of the night, and at this late stage of the debate, I do not intend to detain the House long. I think I had better commence with some reference to the hon. gentleman (Hon. Mr. Ross, Victoria, N.S.) who has just taken his seat. He is a sort of Rip Van Winkle, who appears to have been asleep ever since the honest Liberalism of 1873. He has not wakened up to the condition of the new Liberalism of this country, or he would not make the statements he has with reference to the Conservative party. His treatment of the sacred word and his effort to weave it in with the conduct and policy of the Liberal party to-day, certainly does not result in a very harmonious production. You could no more apply the sacred word to their conduct-why, there comes in the Rip Van Winkle again. He is thinking of the honest Liberals, of the Dor-ions and Mackenzies. He said that they had free trade in corn and spoke of Joseph going down into Egypt. It was not Joseph, but Joseph's brethren, the rascals who sold him there.

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March 28, 1901

Mr. BRODER.

I only wish to say that consistency is a jewel which you will never find over there, and we need not look for it. Men who have talked free trade for twenty years are there now, declaring themselves to be tariff revenue men or free traders in principle, who cannot apply free trade to this country. If there is anything at all in the free trade argument, the sooner you apply it to a young country, the easier it is to apply it. Hon. gentlemen opposite are not honest when they make that statement, because they try to shelter themselves for not applying their policy to the country behind the statement that this is a new country and it cannot be applied. if they cannot apply their policy to the country, the honest, straightforward course is for them to go out of office and give others a chance to apply another policy. There is no danger of that, however, in this case. If the country is too young for a free trade policy, I suppose it is because the patient is not strong enough to stand the medicine. The fact is, that hon. gentlemen opposite are afraid of public opinion. They never announced to the country their British preference as a part of their policy. The Minister of Marine and Fisheries (Sir Louis Davies) put a small motion of about three lines on this subject on ' Hansard' some years ago, but it was never discussed on the public platform. They never attempted to put forward that Mr. BRODER.

policy until they got here among their friends who had been fighting for free trade for many years, and who said to them : You must do something in the direction of free trade ; and then the ingenious brain of the Finance Minister conjured up a preference to England, and they threw it to their followers as you might throw a plank to a drowning man ; and on that plank they got ashore. Is that what you talked about to this country for eighteen years ? In all that time it never was mentioned, and hon. gentlemen have not been honest in adopting it. They adopted it merely as an emergency food for their friends ; but it is very weak, and they will not live on it long, and they know it.

Now, the hon. member for Vancouver (Mr. Smith) made some reference to the condition of labour in the United States. Does it not occur to that hon. gentleman and to the House that his argument was not pertinent at all ? Because you find in Europe that the manufactured products of the United States, such as iron, are disturbing the economic conditions of all Europe. Yet, this hon. gentleman talks about protection being *a failure to the labourer in the United States. Where are the labourers who are shut out of our mills going to-day ? They are going to the United States, a highly protected country. Hon. gentlemen could not use an argument more detrimental to their own interest than a comparison of the United States with any free trade country. American iron is displacing English iron in the world's market, and even our own Minister of Railways has to go to the United States to buy engines and cars. When we look over the history of the United States we find that their difficulty only came when they receded from a high tariff, and in every instance they have had to go back to a high tariff in order to keep their labour for their labouring men, and in order to keep pace with the great requirements of the country. There is no country in the world to compare with it, for the enormous success it has had as a commercial country, in the few years, nationally speaking, of its existence. Another thing I wish to refer to is the great increase in the value of the agricultural products of that country under high protection. The increase in the value of agricultural products last year over that of the previous year was no less than four billions of dollars. Yet hon. gentlemen talk about the condition of things in this country. When they make these comparisons, they must expect to be met with the facts.

These are things which every public man should understand before he atempts to legislate for the requirements of this young country. With its enormous resources and the great energy of its people, all it wants is proper management and the proper investing of capital to attain the position it ought to attain as a prosperous and. growing country.

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March 28, 1901

Mr. BRODER.

I am going to answer it, perhaps better than you can. The hon. gentleman's province is much interested now in the iron bounties, and he did not want to say anything about it. Provincial interests came in again, and he is a provincial man. He is not a Dominion man at all, and if he is true to his province, he should support our leader here. If he is a free trader, I do not know how in the world he can sleep in that House over there.

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