Andrew BRODER

BRODER, The Hon. Andrew, P.C.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Dundas (Ontario)
Birth Date
April 16, 1845
Deceased Date
January 4, 1918
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Broder
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=a9a07775-2146-42b3-aa62-6541588c9dd9&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer, merchant

Parliamentary Career

June 23, 1896 - October 9, 1900
CON
  Dundas (Ontario)
November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
CON
  Dundas (Ontario)
November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
CON
  Dundas (Ontario)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
CON
  Dundas (Ontario)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
CON
  Dundas (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 74 of 74)


March 28, 1901

Mr. ANDREW BRODER (Dundas).

At this late hour of the night, and at this late stage of the debate, I do not intend to detain the House long. I think I had better commence with some reference to the hon. gentleman (Hon. Mr. Ross, Victoria, N.S.) who has just taken his seat. He is a sort of Rip Van Winkle, who appears to have been asleep ever since the honest Liberalism of 1873. He has not wakened up to the condition of the new Liberalism of this country, or he would not make the statements he has with reference to the Conservative party. His treatment of the sacred word and his effort to weave it in with the conduct and policy of the Liberal party to-day, certainly does not result in a very harmonious production. You could no more apply the sacred word to their conduct-why, there comes in the Rip Van Winkle again. He is thinking of the honest Liberals, of the Dor-ions and Mackenzies. He said that they had free trade in corn and spoke of Joseph going down into Egypt. It was not Joseph, but Joseph's brethren, the rascals who sold him there.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-THE BUDGET.
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February 11, 1901

Mr. ANDREW BRODER (Dundas).

Mr. Speaker, I wish to refer to a matter which I would be considered derelict in my duty if I failed to refer to in the discussion on the address in reply to the speech from the Throne. Without saying anything with regard to the general treatment which the Canadian government may extend to the volunteers who went from Canada to serve in South Africa, and to the families of the men who lost their lives there, I wish to refer particularly- to the case of Trooper Mulloy, the blind trooper. I may say that he is a native of my county, that he grew up there, that his friends reside there, and I deem it my duty to urge his case upon the consideration of the government. I think we have precedents following the rebellion of 1885, when grants were made to individuals whose circumstances were peculiar; and I believe the country will endorse my suggestion that something ought to be done for this young man. There is no doubt that the personal efforts and sacrifices made by the young man who went to South Africa have reflected glory on every Canadian citizen, and I believe the Canadian government and the Canadian people will willingly extend to those young men the treatment they deserve. There are circumstances connected with this young man's case which will justify the government in doing something for him on a basis altogether different from that on which others may be treated;1 and I only wish to bring his case to the attention of the right hon. leader of the government so that it may not be overlooked.

Topic:   '23 COMMONS
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