Alfred Henry CLARKE

CLARKE, Alfred Henry, K.C., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Essex South (Ontario)
Birth Date
October 25, 1860
Deceased Date
January 30, 1942
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Henry_Clarke
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=b02b1df3-ac36-4951-8ffe-b33051e3f142&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Essex South (Ontario)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  Essex South (Ontario)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  Essex South (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 52 of 53)


February 1, 1909

Mr. A. H. CLARKE (South Essex).

I would rather have it as it is now. It seems to me we are only inviting disputes. The question may come up what ' property ' means. I would very much prefer leaving it at large so that if any damage occurs they should be liable for that damage whatever it is. It would perhaps not be as good a Bill for the lawyers, but it would save confusion. If the House wishes to add the word ' property ' I will acquiesce.

Topic:   RAILWAY ACT AMENDMENT-FIRE CAUSED BY LOCOMOTIVES.
Full View Permalink

February 1, 1909

Mr. A. H. CLARKE.

A case has arisen in the courts of Ontario in regard to marsh hay which has been baled. The contention has already been set up that this does not come within the definition of crops, and the courts held that it does. But the case is still subject to appeal, the words are capable of some misconstruction. I therefore move that these words be struck out, and that the section as amended shall read as follows:

Whenever damage is caused by a fire started by a railway locomotive, the company making use of such locomotive, whether guilty of negligence or not, shall be liable to such damage.

So whatever property is damaged, the company will be liable for such damage. The section was introduced last year by the then member for New Westminster and was referred to the Railway Committee, and passed in almost the very words of the Bill I am now proposing. The only difference was that instead of leaving the question of liability entirely at large the Railway Committee inserted words making it read 'damage to any property.' I have no particular objection if the House thinks it proper to add these words, but I would prefer to have them omitted. For instance, damage might be caused to a human being, a house might be set on fire and the inmates injured. But if it were limited to property there would be no liability in that case. It seems to me there is as much reason to make it apply to injury to human beings or, say, to live stock, as to property, and, as it has been fully considered by the Railway Committee, I think the House might pass it through the Committee of the Whole without sending it to the Railway Committee.

Topic:   RAILWAY ACT AMENDMENT-FIRE CAUSED BY LOCOMOTIVES.
Full View Permalink

January 25, 1909

1. What establishments have applied for exemption under the Meat and Canned Foods Act?

2. What establishments have been exempted from the operation of sections 3 and 4 and sections 6 and 10, inclusive?

3. What directions have been given by the government to railways or other carriers relating to the transportation of dressed hogs?

4. Have such directions been given respecting the transportation of dressed hogs to consignees other than ' establishments ' as defined by the said Act? If so, by what authority ?

5. At what points in the counties of Essex and Kent has provision been made for inspection of dressed hogs, and what is the nature of such provision?

6. Why has not similar provision been made for inspection at the other shipping points in the said counties?

7. Why were the service of qualified local inspectors dispensed with?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   MEAT AND CANNED FOODS ACT.
Full View Permalink

March 6, 1905

Mr. A. H. CLARKE (South Essex).

I am very much pleased to find that the Postmaster General is about to collect the information necessary to enable us to ascertain whether or not Canada can afford a rural delivery system. The hon. member for West Kent has spoken of his constituency as an excellent place in which to make the experiment, but I assure the House that I can offer an even more suitable territory, a territory nearer the border still, in the riding of South Essex. Before the opening of this session, a very compact township in that riding was so desirous of having a rural mail delivery, that the township suggested that it would be willing to pay half the cost if the government would undertake to pay the other half. I commend the enterprise of this township to the attention of Mr. FOSTER.

the Postmaster General. The people of Essex have seen the system work satisfactorily in the state of Michigan, and they have a feeling that what is good for the United States is certainly not too good for Canada. If the expense is not excessive, it will afford gieat satisfaction to the farmers of our country should the Postmaster General be able to establish the system, because now a days the farmer takes his daily paper and he wants conveniences similar to those which may be obtained in the cities. I thought in the earlier part of the session that the matter was at an end when it was stated that the expense was too great for this country to bear, and that they were getting tired of it in the United States, but I am glad the Postmaster General has offered to procure the information necessary to enable the House to form a satisfactory opinion, as to whether or not it would be wise to adopt the system in Canada.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   NORTH YORK.
Full View Permalink

February 24, 1905

Mr. A. H. CLARKE.

Representing, as I do, a constituency in which tobacco is very largely grown, I wish to express my appreciation of the fostering influence which the policy of this government has had on that industry. In South Essex the growth of tobacco was begun earlier than in any other county of Ontario. Before the birth of any hon. gentleman in this House, the French Canadians there grew their own tobacco, and have been smoking it with a great deal of pleasure ever since. It is not many years ago when they could only get 4 cents a pound for their tobacco and then could only sell it with difficulty, but during the past year, under present conditions, they have sold at least 3,000.000 pounds and realized some $300,000 when they could not realize much from other crops on account of the wetness of the season. The people will commend the government if the government will not only continue the present policy of protecting the Canadian leaf but also establish some experimental station in South Essex in order that the leaf may be perfected so as to suit the taste of even the most particular. In Kingsville, cigars are now being manufactured wholly of Canadian leaf and a most successful trade is expected to be developed in that line.' I would urge the government to continue the work of perfecting and protecting the Canadian leaf in every way possible.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Full View Permalink