George Matheson MURRAY

MURRAY, George Matheson

Parliamentary Career

June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  Cariboo (British Columbia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 2 of 91)


February 14, 1962

Mr. Curran:

It was prepared to be presented in 1952 or 1953.

Topic:   AMENDMENTS EXTENDING PAYMENTS TO CERTAIN GROUPS
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May 12, 1953

Mr. Murray (Cariboo):

I shall take up a lance in defence of these beautiful young ladies any afternoon. They serve us who travel and who are sometimes irritable and wanting this and that right away. The fact is that there are not sufficient facilities at these various air terminals. T.C.A. is giving a wonderful service, as is C.P.A. and the other lines. We should remember we are in

the air age. We are not in the horse and buggy age; we are not even in the autobus age; we are in the air age, and we should enlarge and improve these facilities for the service of our own people and those who want to come to our shores.

Topic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF APPOINTMENT OF THE CHIEF JUSTICE OF CANADA, THE SPEAKER OF THE SENATE, THE SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS AND THE LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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May 12, 1953

Mr. Murray (Cariboo):

Many a man has been disappointed.

Topic:   CIVIL AVIATION
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO NEW COMMERCIAL ROUTES IN UNITED STATES
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May 12, 1953

Mr. Murray (Cariboo):

I know that this is the end of this parliament, that shortly the curtain will come down upon this parliament, and a great many splendid things have been done. But how much more happy I would have been if I could have returned to the Peace river country and said that the government of Canada had decided to fling a railroad in there so that those people would have an outlet to their natural markets on the Pacific coast.

I realize that under the chaotic political conditions now existing in British Columbia

we cannot expect the initiative for the construction of this Pacific coast outlet to come from there. 1 know that the minister could easily say that this is primarily a provincial obligation. Northern Alberta and British Columbia are entitled to a Pacific rail outlet. Theoretically at any rate those two provinces are in a position to join forces for the building of that outlet without any assistance from the government of Canada, since there are Social Credit premiers at Victoria and Edmonton. Together they could initiate and carry out the program they have repeatedly promised but which has not been undertaken.

We did get an extension north from Prince George to the Peace river country for which I commend and thank the minister who was associated with the construction of that 80-mile road which was part of the policy of the premier of British Columbia under a Liberal administration. They had promised to construct an outlet into the Peace river country. When they went ahead with that 80-mile road a subsidy was paid by this government with the kind approval and support of the Minister of Transport. I hope that the day will come again in British Columbia when a Liberal government will sit at Victoria and we will be able to continue where we left off in the construction of a rail line into the Peace river valley serving, as I have said, a country larger than western Ontario, a great agricultural country, a country rich in timber resources, coal and other minerals and which has now come into the picture as a great producer of oil and natural gas.

If I am permitted to return to this scene following the next election I hope to come with new vigour and to make a further argument to the minister and those who are associated with him in an effort to convince them that the primary job of the 22nd parliament of Canada should be the development of the Peace river country and the providing of transportation facilities equal to those in Ontario, Manitoba or elsewhere.

Topic:   CIVIL AVIATION
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO NEW COMMERCIAL ROUTES IN UNITED STATES
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May 12, 1953

Mr. Murray (Cariboo):

In that connection may I say that it is good to learn that the intention is to bring the telephone and telegraphic services in the interior of British Columbia up to a high degree of efficiency. I should like to say to the minister that, regardless of any agreement which is made with any of these companies, there will remain the claim of ranchers 80 miles or 100 miles out, miners, settlers and so on, who depend upon this communication system for their very existence.

When British Columbia entered confederation in 1871 that was one of the main points taken into consideration in the agreement with Canada. Commitments made at that time, regardless of any decisions made now, must be carried out. Let us take the case of a rancher a hundred miles out from the rail, in a little community at the end of a trail. In times past the telegraph or telephone system of this government has serviced that little community, and it was available to save life or limb, or to bring relief. It was not operated on a cash and carry basis. Today in the Cariboo country we have hundreds of miles of these telegraph and telephone lines leading out into the remote areas. Neither the British Columbia Telephone Company, the Bell Telephone Company nor anybody else would be able to make any revenue from that service. Nevertheless it is necessary and vital to the success of that country.

We are most fortunate in having a minister who realizes the humanitarian aspect of the matter as well as the cash and carry side of

[Mr. Applewhaite.l

the communications service in that great part of British Columbia which is progressing so rapidly and emerging from pioneer status to that of a commercial area in Canada. New towns in that area are growing up with 1,000 telephones, or 500 or 400 as the case may be. A decision has to be made as to whether this service will be carried on under the crown or whether we will sell it to a private industry.

Topic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF APPOINTMENT OF THE CHIEF JUSTICE OF CANADA, THE SPEAKER OF THE SENATE, THE SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS AND THE LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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