William Gawtress RAYMOND

RAYMOND, William Gawtress

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Brantford (Ontario)
Birth Date
March 24, 1855
Deceased Date
April 23, 1942
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Gawtress_Raymond
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=bf906e40-3c8f-4169-b5a8-d811e6337887&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
merchant, postmaster

Parliamentary Career

December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
LIB
  Brantford (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 26 of 27)


March 20, 1922

Mr. RAYMOND:

It seems to me that if a tariff is a tax, and I take it that it is, it would hardly be fair that one section of the community should ask to be freed from that tax. I think that is a reasonable conclusion; I do not see why they should. I do not think they can point to any direction in which they pay more taxes than anyone else. I remember in the opening address, during the same election to which I have already alluded, the right hon. member for Grenville made a statement as to the amount paid by farmers in direct taxation for, if my memory serves me right, the months of April, May, June and July. The statement was that out of $67,000,000 paid into the Treasury of Canada less than two-thirds per cent was paid by the farmers of the country. Now that being so, it shows that they are not unduly taxed in that direction; that being so, is it fair that they should escape the tariff tax? I do not think it is.

Topic:   THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH ADDRESS IN REPLY
Full View Permalink

March 20, 1922

Mr. RAYMOND:

He used those words, "a deed of the blackest political infamy." Now it is not in the hands of anybody, even if he is the Prime Minister or the whole Government of this country, to say whom a constituency shall send to Parliament. I say that that would be absolutely reversing the whole of our democratic institutions. Any man, whether he be the Prime Minister of this country or anybody else, who will come and tell the free people of any electoral district in this country whom they should send to Parliament, or whom they should not send, is arrogating to himself something that belongs to no man in this country, because under our constitution it is for the people themselves to select their representative.

The Address

It has been tried time and again in the Old Country, and invariably the will of the people in the selection of their candidates is what regulates their parliamentary representation. Those words were so terrible to me-I have never had worse applied to me in my short existence on this terres-tial sphere-that I began to think a little. I began to ask myself what I would consider a deed of the blackest political infamy. Well, I suppose we all have different ideas of politics and the science of government, and I am sure those ideas have been enunciated from all points of view in this House, but what made me take my first active interest in politics I think was this: I believed that at the very root and foundation of our liberty was the freedom of our parliamentary representation, that a man's vote should be free, and if you follow through the various successes of the Liberal party you will see that it was to obtain that liberty and preserve that right, to give to each constituency the absolute right to send whom it pleased to parliament, that our battles were fought. We look upon that as our greatest liberty; it is the foundation of our whole parliamentary system; it is the foundation of our freedom; it is the foundation upon which the power of the British Empire has been carried through the world; it is a right that has been bought for us by the blood of our ancestors, and therefore as a work of man I revere it as something sacred, this liberty of the people with regard to the franchise and the selection of their representation in parliament. Then if that be so, if you agree with me, can you think of any deed of blacker political infamy than an act that would take away from the men of this country, men who were out fighting in the field and shedding their blood in our defence, fighting our battles abroad for the freedom we prize so much-can you think of a deed of blacker political infamy or anything more malignant than that their franchise should be taken away from them and cast to the winds? Can you think of anything blacker or more iniquitous on the statute book of any free country than the War Time Elections Act of a few years ago? That, Sir, was my idea of a deed of the blackest political infamy, and I believe it would be the opinion of the people of this country. At all events, I say it with pride, it was the opinion of the electors of the constituency of Brantford. They resented that act, and that is why I am here.

With regard to the attitude of the manufacturers of Brantford I would just like to say this: If the sentiment expressed by the hon. member for Marquette, that our laws should be on the basis of equal justice to all with special privileges to none, is endorsed by his followers or by the majority of them, I can freely and frankly and fairly appeal to them to agree with my position upon the tariff. In brief it is this-I do not intend to take more time in stating it than is necessary-I think we must admit that the tariff is a tax. We on this side claim it is a tax, but placed for the purpose of giving revenue; it is so put that it gives such incidental protection as is possible to our manufacturers. However, regard it how you will, any tariff is a tax. Well then, granting that it is a tax, should it be possible that one section of the community should escape the tax while other sections of the community have to bear their taxation? In other words in the case of implements, tools, etc., used by the farmers, would it be fair to ask that they should come in free to this country while the tools that are used by mechanics-moulders, carpenters, masons and others-in other industries come in taxed?

Topic:   THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH ADDRESS IN REPLY
Full View Permalink

March 20, 1922

Mr. RAYMOND:

He now says "Hear, hear." He also seemed to think it was an act of presumption on my part to venture to contest the riding at all against his friend who had formerly represented it. I was at a loss to quite understand the position he took in that matter. He made a statement at a public meeting at which about three thousand people were present that for me to run on the platform I did as a supporter of the Prime Minister was a deed of the blackest political in-[DOT]famy.

Topic:   THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH ADDRESS IN REPLY
Full View Permalink

March 20, 1922

Mr. RAYMOND:

That is not exactly the point I raised, Mr. Speaker. It was rather this, that when the right hon. member for Grenville came to Brantford he found fault with the attitude I took, and I should like to explain it to him now. Possibly he never really understood that attitude, I should like to explain to him just what it was. He came to Brantford, as I say, and told the people of that city that the great issue before the country was protection; that if they wanted to avoid unemployment; if they wanted to avoid soup kitchens and all that kind of thing, they would have to support the policy of protection. That was the argument all over the country; I do not think the right hon. gentleman will deny it. At all events, it was his argument in Brantford. Well, we hapened to have some three thousand men or so out of work at that time, there being no employment for them in the agricultural implement factories. I remember on that occasion the right hon. gentleman was asked: How about tractors? What protection have we upon them? I do not remember the answer he gave; I do know, however, that it was not satisfactory to those who were interested in seeing the tractor industry go on, because some $20,000,000 worth of tractors had been imported into Canada which otherwise would have been made here. Now, when the duty was taken off tractors it may have been a wise measure; I am not saying it was not. But I do say that when the right hon. gentleman came to Brantford and claimed that protection was the only issue before the country at that time-

Topic:   THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH ADDRESS IN REPLY
Full View Permalink

March 20, 1922

Mr. RAYMOND:

The hon. gentleman

asks me a very fair and reasonable question, and I think I can give him a very fair and reasonable answer. There was a small duty on binder twine at one time, and before that duty was taken off there were several binder twine factories in this country, but when the duty was taken off they gradually went out of business, and I believe the only one left in this country today is the one at Brantford, and perhaps one in Welland. I am sorry I cannot give my hon. friend exact figures as to the output of the factory in Brantford, but the fact remains that these other factories all went out of business in this country. The combine which controls twine manufacture on the other side of the line did not see fit to drive the Brantford factory

out of business, and so it has remained. They could drive that factory out if they thought it advisable to do so, and in that case, with no factory in Brantford, our farmers from one end- of Canada to the other would have to submit to the price dictated by the combine in the United States.

Topic:   THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH ADDRESS IN REPLY
Full View Permalink