Winfield Chester Scott MCLURE

MCLURE, Winfield Chester Scott

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
Birth Date
March 16, 1875
Deceased Date
June 18, 1955
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chester_McLure
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=c638ba68-559c-40ce-ac85-82aa844a881c&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
broker, teacher, trader

Parliamentary Career

July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
PC
  Queen's (Prince Edward Island)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 303)


May 13, 1953

Mr. McLure:

In connection with that

matter, I might say that the figures given by the minister as to the size of the herd at the present time do not correspond with the take-off. The take-off of pelt has gone down each year. According to last year's report, and as I had information from one member of the research party, it is now more difficult to make a selection of skins owing to some form of disease that is in 68108-332i

Supply-Fisheries

the herd that arrives there from time to time.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
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May 13, 1953

Mr. McLure:

There is a reduction of $15,000 in this item. Are they giving the same bounty on each head, or are they reducing it? Why the reduction?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
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May 13, 1953

Mr. McLure:

As I said, our contract of 1873 reads that we should have these and other things in comparison with other provinces in Canada. You cannot deny us that right according to our agreement and until we do

Supply-Post Office

get it you will hear from me as long as I am here.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
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May 13, 1953

Mr. McLure:

Mr. Chairman, I am not going to take up some other items I would like to mention, because I do not want anyone to think I am trying to hold up these estimates. I do say again that I was rather disappointed in the committee of the house that was set up to study the problems of the rural mail couriers. There are no two ways about it, that committee were either in a hurry or they missed out on what was to be considered. Most of the problems considered were all right and I have no objection to them, but I do think a few of the rural mail couriers themselves from different localities should have been brought in. Then the committee and the Postmaster General would soon have found out what they desired and what they really wanted.

I have often said on the floor of the house here when these estimates were up that discrimination as between contracts-and I

am speaking particularly of my own constituency-is something that one can hardly realize until he figures it out. You will find, as I said before, one man driving 20 miles and receiving a certain amount. There will be another man driving 40 miles who will receive $500 less than the man driving 20 miles. I have made calculations for every mail route in my constituency, and I have placed most of those figures on the record. I am not going to repeat that at this late date.

I want to close by saying this to the Postmaster General. I hope he will make a visit to our province in the near future-I am not making any prognostications about the election-to see what is going on there in the Post Office Department. I should like him to look over our post office and our staff, and I know he will find certain things which, in his wisdom, he will correct. Then I would not have to come here and talk in this manner on the floor of the house.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
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May 13, 1953

Mr. McLure:

His commission under his contract was only $2 on every $100 worth sold. However, the post office refuses to give him that now. It is not much wonder that they have big revenues and big surpluses if they conduct all their business in that way; but since there is no surplus now I do not know what to say about it.

I do want to say to you, Mr. Chairman, and through you to the new Postmaster General, that this man after giving 79 years' service, taking the 8-hour day as you must today, ought to have some small pension. Then let him retire. Other people are getting

enormous pensions, and I do not blame them for getting all they can; but a thing like this looks so small for our postal department here in Ottawa, taking from this man over half of his legitimate commission. It would amount to $780, I understand, or probably a little more according to the number of stamps sold. They have no right, Mr. Chairman- and I want the minister to hear this-to defraud that man of the commission that is due him.

I have spoken on this before, but I am going to keep it up for a while yet.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
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