Thomas CANTLEY

CANTLEY, Col. The Hon. Thomas, Hon. LL.D.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Pictou (Nova Scotia)
Birth Date
April 19, 1857
Deceased Date
February 24, 1945
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Cantley
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=f2367d93-a0b4-4bd8-97d0-75bd0f7da9e6&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
manufacturer

Parliamentary Career

October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
CON
  Pictou (Nova Scotia)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
CON
  Pictou (Nova Scotia)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Pictou (Nova Scotia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 287 of 288)


January 25, 1926

Mr. CANTLEY:

I know of no rate being asked for except on the quantity that I refer to: 6,000 tons a month for the next two and a half months. I do not admit the railway cannot haul that coal for that money, for this reason: They are hauling hundreds of cars down to Cape Breton which are coming back light. Those cars have to be hauled back in any case. This amounts to only four carloads a day hauled over the railway from Sydney Mines to Montreal at a rate of $3.25 a ton. Further, Mr. Speaker, if there were a loss, the government could easily have provided for it. There was in the estimates of 1024-25 an item of $200,000 covering assistance towards the shipment of coal from the Maritime and western provinces, and only about $50,000 was expended. The balance lapsed on the 31st March, 1025, and it was not revoted. If I am correct in my understanding of the situation, that amount was available by Governor General's warrant as being an unexpended part of a vote, and it could have been devoted to making up any shortage, if there were a shortage, in the cost of moving that coal.

As regards the character of the men who are working in the collieries of Cape Breton, and particularly those of North Cape Breton, Sydney Mines, I had the proud privilege of being their general manager for twenty years, and there is no finer body of men in this country, either ,in the houses of parliament or amongst workers on the farms, in the mines or anywhere else. We have men there who, on occasions of danger following explosions and fires, have exhibited heroism unexcelled by any other men in any country, at any time, or in any war. These men deserve some consideration from this House. Are we going to balk on a question as small as the pittance represented by the loss, if there be any loss, in hauling this coal for $3.25 a ton? At any rate, this loss will not exceed a few thousand dollars. The House and the country should take this matter into consideration and deal with it promptly and effectively.

Topic:   NOVA SCOTIA COAL MINERS
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January 25, 1926

Mr. CANTLEY:

I thought possibly the hon. gentleman wanted the information, and I could give it to him. Might I speak on a question of privilege?

Topic:   NOVA SCOTIA COAL MINERS
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January 25, 1926

Mr. CANTLEY:

I do not know anything

of the kind, and neither does my hon. friend I do know, however, that Sir Henry Thornton could make a contract for coal to-morrow if he wanted to. An attempt has been made during the past two weeks to have such a contract made, but without success. My hon. friend might assist.

Topic:   NOVA SCOTIA COAL MINERS
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January 25, 1926

Mr. CANTLEY:

What about the price?

Topic:   NOVA SCOTIA COAL MINERS
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January 25, 1926

Mr. CANTLEY:

Mr. Speaker, there seems to be some misapprehension, and I take it that the hon. gentleman who has just spoken really desires information. When the British Empire Steel Corporation was formed, it embraced in the province of Nova Scotia, the Dominion Coal Company, the Dominion Steel Company, the Scotia Company-or the Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Company, to give its full name

and two subsidiaries of the last named company, the Acadia Coal Company and the Eastern Car Company. I have been a director of the Scotia Company for twenty-five years and I am proud of it; I have been associated with it for forty years. I never became a director of Besco. I am not now, and never intend to be. The reason these corporations are kept in existence is that there are underlying securities of all three corporations which could not be wiped off except by paying a premium, and to get sufficient money to replace the securities, the bonds and debentures would have meant a cost of $2,000,000 or $3,000,000 at least.

For that reason Besco has continued the independent corporate existence of these different companies. I have remained on the board partially because I wanted to have an opportunity of watching what our friends the Besco were doing with these corporations in which I have had a vital interest for a long time. Beyond that I have no interest whatever in them, and as I said before I have no connection with the Besco corporation as such. I have been asked to join the Besco board on several occasions, and have declined. I hope I have made myself perfectly clear.

Topic:   NOVA SCOTIA COAL MINERS
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