Thomas CANTLEY

CANTLEY, Col. The Hon. Thomas, Hon. LL.D.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Pictou (Nova Scotia)
Birth Date
April 19, 1857
Deceased Date
February 24, 1945
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Cantley
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=f2367d93-a0b4-4bd8-97d0-75bd0f7da9e6&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
manufacturer

Parliamentary Career

October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
CON
  Pictou (Nova Scotia)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
CON
  Pictou (Nova Scotia)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Pictou (Nova Scotia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 5 of 288)


March 22, 1935

Mr. CANTLEY:

It is a long way off.

Topic:   * RAILWAY ACT AMENDMENT
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March 21, 1935

Mr. THOMAS CANTLEY (Pictou):

Mr. Speaker, I know of no reason why this inspection could not have taken place earlier. It is an outrage to have these ships going to American ports to be repaired. If the people in control of the fleet had had a little forethought that ship might have been put into order a month ago.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
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March 21, 1935

Mr. CANTLEY:

Before her present voyage, or if application had been made to the classification society they would have granted the needed delay of a month or even three months.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
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March 11, 1935

Mr. CANTLEY:

I do not think there can be any possible doubt as to the advantage of an eight hour day; as a matter of fact we have had the eight hour day in most industries for some considerable time. In my life time there has been a very great change. I remember that in my boyhood days shipyard work demanded a twelve hour day, and that situation existed in many other industries as well. The length of the working day has a very important effect on the accidents in industry; as to that there is no possible doubt. There are three periods during which accidents reach their highest point. The first is Monday morning, or the morning after a holiday; that is the hour in which most accidents occur. The next is the first hour or hour and a half of the ordinary working day, or from seven o'clock to eight o'clock or half past eight, and the third accident period is the closing hour in the afternoon. If hon. members will give the matter a little thought they will realize that I have stated the facts. Some few men who go off on a week-end holiday, or for a holiday longer than that, perhaps do not spend their time in the best possible manner, with the result that Monday mornings following holidays produced their crop of accidents. Of course I speak about the steel works, machine shop work and work

Eight Hour Day

in the rolling mills and forges. There we had first aid equipment, a registered nurse in attendance and an ambulance service always available.

There are other phases of the matter which I believe should be given the attention of hon. members. I do not know whether or not I am in order when I attempt to take them up at this time. There are several classes of workers who could not come under the operation of eight-hour day legislation; certainly fishermen and farmers could not. The farmer's day is never done, at least in certain seasons of the year. We could not control his working hours; no legislation enacted by this parliament or any legislative body could do that.

Then we come to that type of operations in which materials are transformed. Let us for a moment consider blast furnaces. A blast furnace operation is continuous from the time the furnace is blown in until it is blown out. That period of time may be one year, it may be five years, nine years or even longer than that. The fact is that so long as the furnace is in blast the operation is continuous; it operates on Sunday, Monday and every other day and no regard is had for the end of the week, holidays or any regulations which may be made.

Mr. MITOHElLL: The eight hour day is

used in blast furnace operations, both in the United States and in 'Canada.

Topic:   C0A1M0NS
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March 11, 1935

Mr. CANTLEY:

When I referred a few minutes ago to the difficulties of the situation and said that some regulations would have to be made in that connection, I hope the committee did not form the opinion that I was opposed to an eight hour day, because I am not. For more than twenty years our practice was to have a sixty hour week; to-day I believe a forty-four hour week will produce more in the course of a year and under better conditions for both the workmen and the employer than would a longer week. If the committee will bear with me, I shall give one or two reasons why I hold that opinion. In a steel plant the repair gang is an important part of the organization. Under ordinary conditions twenty years ago when the mills ceased work at six o'clock Saturday night, the repair gang of thirty or forty men came cn, worked all Saturday night, all day Sunday and all Sunday night to get the mills, hammers, presses and furnaces into proper condition for resuming work on Monday morning. About twenty years ago some men came into my office one Saturday and suggested that Saturday afternoon during the summer months from June to September should be a holiday. I thought the idea was a good one and agreed to it. What was the result? We were able to get our repair work all completed in the Saturday afternoon and

Saturday night or by Sunday morning without any Sunday work, which the repair gang appreciated. That also meant a considerable saving so far as the cost of repairs was concerned because Sunday work was paid double time. All needed repairs were completed, whereas under former conditions there very often was not time enough between six o'clock Saturday night and Monday morning to complete the repairs. At the end of that season I decided that a half holiday on Saturday was the proper thing every month in the year, and it has been in effect ever since. To-day more goods can be produced in a forty-four hour week in almost every line of manufacture than in sixty or seventy hours twenty years ago; I think we all agree as to that. The hon. member for Antigonish-Guysborough thinks this legislation is not required. It is required in some sections of the country at least in regard to some operations. There will have to be a good deal done by way of providing for the classes of labour that I referred to a little while ago, and it will be only by trial and error and changes and modifications in the next two or three years to get it working smoothly that we shall finally get the measure in such shape that practically everyone will be in favour of it.

Topic:   C0A1M0NS
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